Yushchenko Loses His Bid for Re-Election as President; Tymoshenko, Yanukovych Likely in a Runoff

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

Yushchenko Loses His Bid for Re-Election as President; Tymoshenko, Yanukovych Likely in a Runoff


Byline: Natalia A. Feduschak, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

LVIV, Ukraine -- In a devastating rebuke of the Orange Revolution, President Victor Yushchenko lost his bid to win re-election Sunday, and Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko and pro-Russia opposition leader Viktor Yanukovych appeared headed for a runoff vote in three weeks.

Mr. Yanukovych got 38 percent of the vote and Mrs. Tymoshenko received 24 percent, the Central Election Commission said, after 25 percent of the vote had been counted. The results reflected exit polls that showed Mr. Yanukovych leading the race with 31.5 percent, while Mrs. Tymoshenko garnered 27.2 percent. Mr. Yushchenko received only 6 percent of the vote.

Sunday's vote puts in question Kiev's political direction and opens the door for Russia to make a strong push in re-establishing influence over Ukraine.

During his presidency, Mr. Yushchenko had steered a strongly pro-Western course. Both Mr. Yanukovych and Mrs. Tymoshenko have said they will continue with Ukraine's European integration. Both have also said relations with Russia are important, although Mr. Yanukovych is likely to push Ukraine closer to Moscow.

Russia has politically supported Mr. Yanukovych and his Region's Party over the years. Still, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has publicly praised his working relationship with Mrs. Tymoshenko, which had led to concerns that her relationship with Moscow is too cozy.

A beaming Mrs. Tymoshenko told reporters the exit poll results showed that Ukraine remains a European democratic country. This means that Yanukovych, who represents criminal circles, has no chance. I am convinced that Yanukovych's hand will never rest on the [Bible] to take the presidential oath.

Mr. Yanukovych appeared in public shortly after Mrs. Tymoshenko. Commenting on the exit poll results, he said, "Our citizens voted for change in their lives. I should do all to unite the country so it's strong, independent and to better the lives of citizens. .. I will build a strong

country that will be respected in the world"

Mr. Yushchenko's loss in Sunday's race marks the end of a tumultuous era that was filled with high hopes that were often unrealized. He was catapulted to power in 2004 during Ukraine's legendary Orange Revolution. Hundreds of thousands at that time packed capital Kiev to protest an election that was rigged in Mr.

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Yushchenko Loses His Bid for Re-Election as President; Tymoshenko, Yanukovych Likely in a Runoff
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