The Ceramic Sphere: Newer Ceramics Criticism and the Expanding Field

By Welch, Adam | Ceramics Art & Perception, September-November 2009 | Go to article overview

The Ceramic Sphere: Newer Ceramics Criticism and the Expanding Field


Welch, Adam, Ceramics Art & Perception


SOME ARGUE THAT CRITICISM IN CERAMICS LACKS INTELLECTUAL rigor and critical scrutiny, which is the reason ceramics is held in lower esteem than art. Despite the overwhelming consensus formulated around this opinion, it is not founded on rational argumentation. To evaluate the legitimacy of this argument we should determine what we mean by criticism. Crucially we should come to some consensus about what we mean by ceramics. Both terms are used in a wide variety of ways. The basic problem is that under any reasonable interpretation, the categories are broad and have become ambiguous through a variety of use. This ambiguity defines not only the condition of criticism but also the ceramic activity of our contemporaneity. Ceramics criticism is a body of critical writing whose focus is the ceramic object or concept and all of its inter-connectivity with the world--not a style of criticism that is specific to ceramics. In this sense, it is not different from nor does it need to be different from other styles of criticism. This paper uncovers the roots of the confusion, which are based on pathological necessity more than reason, to answer the questions: What is ceramics? What is the ceramics sphere? And what is ceramics criticism?

The field is more or less agreed upon what it would like to accomplish--the creation of a newer ceramics criticism--and the conversation revolves around the best way of achieving it. The reality is that criticism, both intellectual and critical, does exist and the confusion stems not from the lack of critical writing, but rather it is the result of a misrepresentation of the subject (ceramics), what critical writing (criticism) is, its function and the audience who benefits. Creating a theory of ceramics or a theory of criticism is no simple accomplishment. An essentialist position may not hold up under pluralism. Nevertheless, there must exist some fundamental similarity in which to contextualise the work. The aesthetical and philosophical point of the expanding field is constantly shifting and the ideological point seems to be not to have one dominant ideology. This paper sets out to explicate how the field has created a dichotomy perpetuating and entrenching all ceramics into a craft context over and against an artworld context. The following discussion addresses the definition of objects made with ceramics that may or may not reside inside the history or discourse of the field per se.

Recent debates offer polarizing views to remedy criticisms' supposed impotence. On the one hand, there is a movement to excommunicate ceramics from its material categorical designation altogether--finally assimilating ceramics into art--and thereby falling under the reign of art and art criticism. There is a desire to invent a ceramics-specific vocabulary, formulating a criticism and language specific to and only for ceramics. Another still is to ignore as insignificant all practice that does not pursue ceramics' standards and to blame the success of art for lack of equivalent prestige, which is antithetical to criticism's very nature. None of these approaches appears to be thought through completely. Nevertheless, 'ceramics' prevails metaphorically, physically, materially and/or conceptually despite efforts to theorize it away.

There is confusion among barkers promoting a criticism separate from that of art criticism. Criticism is the written application of a theory or multiple theories toward interpretation. It is not necessarily theory in and of itself but the theory set to action. Literary, film, photographic, design, art or ceramics criticism are mutually exclusive. The difference is the filter or the 'historiography' that the criticism is passed through. Is the field seeking theories of art that incorporate ceramic concern or a theory of ceramics which criticism can utilize to facilitate understanding?

The goal of criticism is to explicate essential conceptual points of a work, a body of work, a movement or the field itself.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Ceramic Sphere: Newer Ceramics Criticism and the Expanding Field
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.