The Last Mile

By Weiner, Debra | Newsweek, January 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

The Last Mile


Weiner, Debra, Newsweek


Byline: Debra Weiner

It's been 250 years since the French and Indian War, when George Washington, a young colonial officer, made his way from the eastern seaboard past the forks of the Ohio River, where Pittsburgh now stands. It was a dangerous journey and a miserable return trip--shot at by Indians, knocked off his raft into the icy Allegheny River--lasting 78 days. Today Washington's route (or close to it) has been tamed, turned into the 334-mile Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Towpath-Great Allegheny Passage. Starting in Georgetown, the C&O-GAP rolls across Maryland and through Pennsylvania's Appalachian Mountains to create the longest unpaved bike path in the East. Yet unlike Washington, you won't be able to complete the tour no matter how warm the weather (or how nice the natives). The British are standing in the way.

Not all of Great Britain, mind you. Just a company named Candover, a $3 billion private-equity house in London whose empire controls a snippet of land 7 miles outside of Pittsburgh, without which the path can't be completed. The plot happens to be the home of Sandcastle, a water park, situated not far from where British forces were routed while attempting to capture strategic Fort Duquesne in 1755. No one--not the company or the county--say there's anything sacred about a water slide. But for some reason, Sandcastle won't relinquish an iota of real estate. "This corridor was the lifeline to opening up the center of our country. The bike path is a symbol of that, but by getting truncated, it erases the critical piece," says C&O National Historical Park volunteer historian Karen Gray. "It's like the Washington Monument without its capstone."

True to its wartime heritage, converting this tract into a bike trail has been a long battle. The federal government purchased the obsolete C&O Canal during the Great Depression, but in the 1950s there was a move to pave it into a parkway. …

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