Well, Hello Again, Ike

By Will, George F. | Newsweek, February 8, 2010 | Go to article overview

Well, Hello Again, Ike


Will, George F., Newsweek


Byline: George F. Will

But all this is in the subjunctive mood.

Bill Clinton had been president for just 78 days--it was April 7, 1993--and he was crimson with frustration. As recounted by Bob Woodward in The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House, Clinton vented to his advisers: "?'Where are all the Democrats?' Clinton bellowed. 'I hope you're all aware we're all Eisenhower Republicans,' he said, his voice dripping with sarcasm. 'We're all Eisenhower Republicans here, and we are fighting the Reagan Republicans. We stand for lower deficits and free trade and the bond market. Isn't that great?'?"

Barack Obama, in the 13th month of his presidency, is learning what Clinton learned in his third month: The grinding arithmetic of economic and budgetary facts sets the parameters of political possibility. Candidate Obama rose to the presidency on gusts of gas: "We are the ones we've been waiting for." Today, with the economy still resembling a patient etherized upon a table, and with deficits causing voters' hair to stand on end, Obama is discovering his inner Eisenhower Republican.

Except that Ike never proposed anything as conservative as what Obama proposed last week: a three-year freeze of the approximately one eighth of the budget that is discretionary domestic spending. If Ike had proposed that, it would have been more momentous than Obama's idea because in the 1950s, before the multiplication and enrichment of entitlement programs, discretionary spending was a larger portion of domestic spending than it is today.

Nevertheless, what Obama proposes is large enough to enrage his party's liberal base: It elected him to stop the seas from rising, not to stop the red ink from rising. Obama worrying about deficits is not the change they want to believe in.

They should take a deep breath. His proposal is a gesture that would have minuscule consequences. Were it to happen--don't hold your breath; all this is in the subjunctive mood--a three-year freeze would result in $250 billion in savings over 10 years. And $25 billion a year is barely a rounding error (less than 3 percent) on the projected 10-year deficits of $9 trillion.

It took two years and the loss of 52 Democratic House seats in 1994 to compel Clinton to miniaturize his presidency.

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