Halt START Negotiations; U.S. Security Depends on Reliable Nuclear Deterrence

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Halt START Negotiations; U.S. Security Depends on Reliable Nuclear Deterrence


Byline: Adm. James A. Lyons, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Obama administration is involved in negotiating a new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) to replace the 1991 START Treaty, which expired on Dec. 5. Fortunately, a number of unresolved issues remain between the United States and Russia that must be solved before the conclusion of a new treaty. Not the least of these is Russia's demand that missile defenses be included in the treaty as well as the sharing of telemetry data and Russia's demand to monitor U.S. missile-defense interceptors.

The talks are on a fast track with the hope of resolving outstanding issues by May. Such a treaty would be viewed by the administration as a major step toward achieving one of President Obama's campaign goals - of a world free of nuclear weapons. Sounds appealing, but it has no substance. With thousands of nuclear weapons around the world, neither the knowledge nor the capability to make them will disappear because of the enactment of a treaty or with unilateral U.S. nuclear disarmament.

Despite all the rhetoric, there is no symmetry in the ongoing START negotiations. Here are the facts:

* Russia has embarked on an aggressive modernization program to field new nuclear weapons. Its strategy has placed increased reliance on its ICBM and sea-based-missile nuclear forces. Most important, it has a fully functional infrastructure that will enable it to break out at any time and produce a significant number of warheads each year.

* The United States is the only declared nuclear power that is not modernizing its nuclear forces and does not have the capability to produce a new nuclear warhead. We have reduced our ready nuclear weapons from more than 12,000 to about 2,000. Mr. Obama wants to reduce this to 1,500 warheads now and reportedly seeks reductions to between 500 and 1,000 warheads in the next round of negotiations. We have not designed a new warhead since the 1980s or built one in almost two decades. Our remaining weapons are well past the end of their design life and are deteriorating.

Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Michael R. Anastasio stated, The weapons in the stockpile are not static. The chemical and radiation processing inside the nuclear physics package induce material changes that limit weapon lifetime. According to Thomas P. D'Agostino, energy undersecretary for nuclear security and administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration, our aging warheads continue to be a technical challenge for our best scientists and the risk of a catastrophic technical failure .. cannot be ruled out Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates has stated that there is absolutely no way we can maintain a credible deterrent .. without either resorting to testing our stockpile or pursuing a modernization program Even the United Kingdom and France have modernization programs under way to maintain the viability of their deterrent capability. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Halt START Negotiations; U.S. Security Depends on Reliable Nuclear Deterrence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.