FIVE BRITONS TO WATCH; It's Snow Joke ... We Have Some Real Medal Contenders of Our Own in Vancouver. Matthew Beard Reports

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

FIVE BRITONS TO WATCH; It's Snow Joke ... We Have Some Real Medal Contenders of Our Own in Vancouver. Matthew Beard Reports


Byline: Matthew Beard

BRITAIN'S winter Olympic team of around 50 athletes has been set the target of winning three medals, and if they achieve that aim it will be the best tally since the 1936 Games in the German border town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen.

While the battle for medals in the blue riband Alpine events is expected to be fought CHEMMY ALCOTT SKIING The 28-year-old pin-up from Twickenham is bidding to win Britain's first Olympic medal in Alpine skiing in her third Winter Games. She finished 11th at the 2006 Turin Games but insists she can make it to the podium this time. Alcott's Olympic preparations have been overshadowed by a cash crisis at the British Ski and Snowboard Federation (BSSF) which has cost Britain's top woman skier [pounds sterling]20,000. But she has funded her own training and insisted: "I don't just want to break into the top 10 -- I do believe I've got the talent to challenge for a medal, and a gold one would be fantastic!" When competing: Wednesday 17 February, 7pm.

SINEAD AND JOHN KERR FIGURE SKATING Scottish siblings Sinead and John Kerr hope to win Britain's first Olympic figure skating medal since Torvill and Dean won bronze at the 1994 Lillehammer Games to add to their Boleroassisted gold a decade earlier. Since teaming up in 2000, the Kerrs have won the British ice dance championship seven times. They finished 10th at the Turin Games and last year won bronze at the European championships. The brother and sister team hope to impress the judges with their interpretation of country music legend Johnny Cash's I've Been Everywhere. Before becoming a full-time skater John subsidised his earning as a part-time actor.

When competing: Monday 15 February, 1am.

SHELLEY RUDMAN SKELETON Rudman caused a sensation at the 2006 Turin Games when she won skeleton silver -- Team GB's only medal at the Games -- just three years after taking up the sport. Rudman only made it to Turin after between the Americans, Austrians, Swiss and Germans, the majority of British hopes could lie elsewhere.

Podium finishes are a real prospect in curling and the sliding events of bobsleigh and skeleton -- the "tea tray" on which Shelley Rudman won Britain's sole Olympic medal in the 2006 Turin Winter Games.

Here are some of Britain's medal hopes ...

locals in her home town of Pewsey, Wiltshire, raised [pounds sterling]4,000 for a professional-standard sled. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

FIVE BRITONS TO WATCH; It's Snow Joke ... We Have Some Real Medal Contenders of Our Own in Vancouver. Matthew Beard Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.