Other Girls on Film

The Evening Standard (London, England), February 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Other Girls on Film


Byline: Charlotte O'Sullivan

WHETHER at glitzy US ceremonies or gritty European festivals, women directors seem finally to be moving away from the margins. Here are five females who have blazed a particularly bright trail over the past 12 months. Kathryn Bigelow, 58.

The ex-wife of chestthumping James Cameron now has reason of her own to crow. Her visceral, post-invasion Iraq war drama, The Hurt Locker, has picked up a string of prizes and is nominated for a Best Picture Oscar. It also earned her a nod in the Best Director category. Bigelow has been churning out hardboiled cult classics for years (Blue Steel, Point Break), but had less luck with bigger budgets. With The Hurt Locker, made for only $11 million, she has moved back into her comfort zone. Nora Ephron, 68. She's always had the common touch and excellent writing skills (Ephron won an Oscar for her Silkwood screenplay). With Julie & Julia, she creates another perfect role for Meryl Streep -- as French-food-loverturned-TV-chef Julia Childs -- and hits some perfect comic notes. "You have no talent," sniffs one of Childs's French detractors. "But the Americans will never know the difference." Jane Campion, 55.

Charlotte O'Sullivan SPORTSPHOTO AGENCY REX FEATURES Having apparently lost interest in the business, the tiny New Zealander snuck back into the limelight with the Keats biopic Bright Star.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Other Girls on Film
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.