Jobs vs Deficits in Obama Budget

Manila Bulletin, February 5, 2010 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Jobs vs Deficits in Obama Budget


WASHINGTON US President Barack Obama faced a delicate balancing act in presenting his budget for next year: Stimulating the economy without bankrupting the government.The dilemma has only worsened after a year in which the Obama administration spent unprecedented amounts of public money to wrest the world's largest economy from its deepest economic crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s.Government spending helped return the US economy to growth in the second half of 2009, but that recovery has yet to translate into new jobs - a problem facing many wealthy countries around the world as they emerge from the global recession.With US unemployment at a quarter-century high of 10 per cent, Obama declared jobs his ''number-one focus'' for 2010 in a State of the Union address last week to Congress.At the same time, the White House has acknowledged that federal deficits are running at dangerously high levels. In presenting his 2011 budget proposals Monday, Obama said: ''We simply cannot continue to spend as if deficits don't have consequences.''The federal government will run a record 1.6-trillion-dollar deficit this budget year, about 10.6 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), before falling to 1.3 trillion dollars in the 2011 budget, which starts October 1.Which priority is more important - jobs or debt - depends on who you ask. Some left-leaning politicians said Obama was spending too little to revive job growth, while conservatives fretted that government deficits remained far too high to calm market concerns.''The president has sent us more of the same - a budget that claims to be fiscally responsible, but just below the surface contains more spending, more borrowing and more taxes,'' said Judd Gregg, the top Republican on the Senate's Budget Committee.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Jobs vs Deficits in Obama Budget
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.