World & Nation in 60 Seconds the World the Nation

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 9, 2010 | Go to article overview

World & Nation in 60 Seconds the World the Nation


300,000 Priuses to be recalled:

TOKYO -- Toyota plans to recall about 300,000 Prius hybrids worldwide over a brake problem and will notify the U.S. and Japanese governments today, a news report said, as a top executive will testify before U.S. lawmakers over recall woes that have tarnished its reputation for quality and safety.

World's tallest tower closed:

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- The world's tallest skyscraper has unexpectedly closed to the public a month after its lavish opening, disappointing tourists headed for the observation deck and casting doubt over plans to welcome its first permanent occupants in the coming weeks.

Murder charges rattle Canada:

TORONTO -- The commander of Canada's biggest Air Force base, who once flew dignitaries around the country, has been charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of two women. Col. Russell Williams, 46, was arrested Sunday and is also charged in the sexual assaults of two other women.

Britain hits grim milestone:

KABUL -- Two British soldiers died in a bombing in Afghanistan, officials said Monday, raising Britain's death toll in the conflict to 255 -- the number of Britons lost in the Falklands war of 1982. British, American and Afghan forces are preparing for a major attack on Marjah in Helmand province.

Pope condemns child abuse:

VATICAN CITY -- Pope Benedict XVI condemned abuse of children by priests Monday. For centuries, the Catholic Church has shown its commitment to loving and respecting children and their basic human rights, Benedict told members of the Vatican's Pontifical Council for the Family.

China finds more tainted milk:

BEIJING -- China has found yet another case where large amounts of tainted milk powder from the country's 2008 scandal that should have been destroyed were instead repackaged. Two years ago, China ordered tons of milk products laced with an industrial chemical destroyed but did not do the eradication itself.

Yemen al-Qaida urges attacks:

SAN'A, Yemen -- The deputy chief of al-Qaida's offshoot in Yemen called for attacks on Saudi and U.S. interests in the region in an audio message posted Monday. The statement, purportedly by Said al-Shihri, urged followers "to attack the interests of America and the Crusaders, and their agents ... especially the Saudi" rulers.

Lawyer disputes Haiti charges:

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- The attorney for 10 Americans charged with child kidnapping in Haiti says the group had authorization to take the children. Aviol Fluerant tells said parents gave their kids to the Baptists in good faith, and the group had papers authorizing the children's crossing of the Dominican border. …

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