African Union Moves to Deny Pseudo-Democracies the Cloak of Membership

Cape Times (South Africa), February 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

African Union Moves to Deny Pseudo-Democracies the Cloak of Membership


BYLINE: peter fabricius

The African Union (AU) summit in Addis Ababa earlier this month was happily not a happy place for putschists. First, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, who seized power as a young colonel in 1969, was thwarted in his bid to be re-elected as the AU chairman.

And then the AU leaders closed a large loophole in the organisation's rules to discourage contemporary coups and other "unconstitutional changes of power".

In 1999, the then Organisation of African Unity (OAU) quite radically departed from its notorious blind-eye policy by resolving to suspend governments that seized power unconstitutionally in future. That rule was formalised in the charter of the AU when it took over from the OAU in 2002. The AU made clear that the rule also applied to those who clung to power unconstitutionally.

The rule has been applied several times through the suspension of governments that seized power by force. But coup leaders and others who seized or clung to power unconstitutionally quite soon adapted to the rules by holding elections which they inevitably won, by hook or by crook. The AU then felt obliged to reinstate them as AU members in good standing.

This happened in places like the Central African Republic and in Togo, which was suspended after the army replaced the deceased long-term ironman Eyadema Gnassingb� with his son. When the AU suspended Togo, the son Faure held and won elections. And the AU duly lifted its suspension.

The AU - and its local sub-regional subsidiary, the Southern African Development Community (SADC) - are now expecting that self-appointed Malagasy President Andry Rajoelina will do the same.

He seized power from elected President Marc Ravolomanana last March. The AU and SADC immediately suspended him and launched negotiations aimed at establishing a multiparty transitional authority to prepare for new all-inclusive and properly conducted elections. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

African Union Moves to Deny Pseudo-Democracies the Cloak of Membership
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.