Home-Grown Heroes; the Fraser Coast Is Extremely Proud of Its Aboriginal Residents and Has Embraced a Landmark Series in the Daily Paper Connecting Young Australians with the Region's Indigenous Culture

Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia), July 1, 2009 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Home-Grown Heroes; the Fraser Coast Is Extremely Proud of Its Aboriginal Residents and Has Embraced a Landmark Series in the Daily Paper Connecting Young Australians with the Region's Indigenous Culture


Byline: use an archival pic there are some in advance photos

The Butchulla people are the indigenous people of Fraser Island and a small population (comparatively) still lives on today's Fraser Coast.

Their main community is a farm on the Maryborough-Hervey Bay Road and visitors are welcome.

Last year the Fraser Coast Chronicle, in partnership with the Butchulla, won the coveted United Nations Association Media Peace Award for the Promotion of Aboriginal Reconciliation.

Documented early history of the people of Fraser Island is incomplete and open to debate and discussion. Aboriginal people closely guard many of their traditions, legends and laws and, after European settlement, much of the evidence of the Fraser Island people's way of life was destroyed either intentionally or through ignorance.

The Butchulla people were governed by standards established by the council of elders and generations of tradition. A council of elders comprised a number of mature men with only the eldest being afforded voting rights. The council of elders oversaw visitors to the tribal lands, giving travellers permission to enter and telling them when to leave.

The council ensured both social and environmental laws were adhered to and was responsible for governing the totem system.

Each member of the tribe was allocated a totem which represented a plant or animal.

People were not allowed to hunt, eat or harm their totem or their family's totem except during war, special ceremonies or when crossing non-tribal lands.

Totems were seldom vital food sources and the system helped protect resources that were scarce in the area.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Home-Grown Heroes; the Fraser Coast Is Extremely Proud of Its Aboriginal Residents and Has Embraced a Landmark Series in the Daily Paper Connecting Young Australians with the Region's Indigenous Culture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?