I've Found a New Friend; Lisa Kudrow on Her Special Bond with the Long Lost Relative Who Revealed Her Family's Tragic Past

Daily Mail (London), February 26, 2010 | Go to article overview

I've Found a New Friend; Lisa Kudrow on Her Special Bond with the Long Lost Relative Who Revealed Her Family's Tragic Past


Byline: by Lina Das

FOUR years ago, Lisa Kudrow was in Ireland filming P.S. I Love You when she saw the TV show Who Do You Think You Are? in which celebrities trace their ancestors.

Olympic hurdler Colin Jackson was tracing his family history back to Jamaica and Panama.

'Even though I'd never seen the show before, I was hooked,' she says.

'I watched more episodes and the stories were riveting. I wondered if we could do a show like this in the States.'

Her idea took off -- next week, the U.S. begins screening its version, which promises to be as fascinating as the Bafta-nominated BBC series.

'When we started looking for celebrities, plenty were interested, but weren't sure they had an interesting background,' says Lisa, best-known as Phoebe Buffay in Friends.

'Sarah Jessica Parker was intrigued, but said: "Good luck -- you won't find anything." '

Yet the programme not only discovered she had an ancestor who participated in the famed 19th-century California Gold Rush, but another was accused of witchcraft in the 1692 Salem witch trials.

Her husband Matthew Broderick, another of the show's subjects, found that his grandfather was a 22-year-old medic in World War I who had to tend to soldiers in the thick of the action. He was wounded and awarded the Purple Heart.

Broderick says: 'And I'd always thought of him as Joe the postman.'

Susan Sarandon learned her maternal grandmother had been pregnant and married by the time she was 13 and bigamy is hinted at, too.

But perhaps most astonishingly, Brooke Shields is descended from French royalty.

Having believed her family was descended from Italian aristocracy (one ancestor was the banker to the Vatican), she was stunned at being directly descended from Henry IV of France, with Louis XIV a cousin many generations removed.

DESPITE thinking she had an Italian heritage, when she was growing up, Brooke was always interested in French culture and studied French literature at university.

'She wondered if her lineage had some bearing on that,' says Lisa. 'It's those tiny, weird little connections to the past that make the show so interesting.'

Brooke also learned why her grandmother, Teresa, seemed so 'bitter, sad and afraid' and treated Brooke's mother, Teri, badly -- researchers discovered Teresa had lost her own mother at the age of ten.

Having become the mother figure to her siblings, Teresa lost a brother in a drowning accident. The grief took its toll and Brooke's mother ended up running away. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

I've Found a New Friend; Lisa Kudrow on Her Special Bond with the Long Lost Relative Who Revealed Her Family's Tragic Past
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.