Group Aims to Provide Voice for Jews Who Oppose Zionism

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), February 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Group Aims to Provide Voice for Jews Who Oppose Zionism


Byline: GUEST VIEWPOINT By Rebecca Tumposky

Jews need to oppose Zionism to truly hold up our varied traditions of social justice. As a new and growing organization, the International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network seeks to challenge the violence and injustice of Israeli apartheid, and to challenge the notion that anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.

A 2007 survey reported by The Jerusalem Post found that about half of Jewish-Americans younger than age 35 feel little or no identification with Israel or with the Zionist goal of a Jewish state.

Alienated from the 52 major Jewish organizations in the United States that support Israel in unison, a great number of American Jews have no organized voice on Israel - a nation that claims to represent them. They therefore have few avenues to exert political influence on Israel in their communities and political structures.

IJAN hopes to provide a countervailing voice to this hegemony, led by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, not only in the United States but worldwide.

IJAN is an international network of Jews whose Jewish identities are not based on Zionism but on a plurality of histories and experiences. We share a commitment to participation in struggles against colonialism and imperialism. We therefore oppose Zionism and its manifestation in the state of Israel's ethnic cleansing of the Palestinian people and confiscation of their land.

IJAN, in fact, opposes all imperialist aggression, and strongly calls for ending the military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. The relentless demonization of Arabs and Muslims as "terrorists" over decades, nurtured by the propaganda that Israel is the only truly "civilized" society in the region, made the massive and brutal attacks on innocent Muslim populations acceptable to the American public. The so-called terror groups relentlessly cited in the media are Hezbollah and Hamas. These organizations oppose Israeli invasion, occupation and blockade, but are no threat to the United States.

Israel and its U.S. lobby helped pushed us toward the Iraq war and are exerting similar pressure to attack Iran. Islamophobia has made the amorphous "war on terror" the latest excuse for the United States to maintain the largest military in the world. Israel uses the same pretext to maintain one of the strongest military machines in the world, against its own claim of constant vulnerability.

Many liberals and progressives who oppose the war in Iraq and U.S. dominance in the Middle East struggle to criticize Israel. For many, the defense of Israel comes from the desire to support the Jewish community and from the misguided perception that criticism of Israel amounts to anti-Semitism.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Group Aims to Provide Voice for Jews Who Oppose Zionism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.