Are the Ice Caps Melting? the Phrase "The Ice Caps Are Melting!" Is Almost a Chant by Those Hanging on to Climate-Change Theory despite Much Evidence of IPCC-Scientist Fraud. So What's Up with the Ice?

By Terrell, Rebecca | The New American, February 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

Are the Ice Caps Melting? the Phrase "The Ice Caps Are Melting!" Is Almost a Chant by Those Hanging on to Climate-Change Theory despite Much Evidence of IPCC-Scientist Fraud. So What's Up with the Ice?


Terrell, Rebecca, The New American


"The entire polar ice cap ... could be completely ice free within the next five to seven years." So claimed global-warming magnate Al Gore at last December's UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen. The scientist he referenced, Dr. Wieslav Maslowski, is a Department of Oceanography professor with the U.S. Naval Post-Graduate School. Maslowski denied making the prediction in an interview with the U.K. Times Online. "I would never try to estimate likelihood at anything as exact as this." A shamefaced Gore admitted gleaning the "ballpark figure" from a conversation he had with Maslowski several years ago. Yet only days before Gore's Copenhagen speech, the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) published a report of Maslowski's research. It read, "Should the present trend of sea ice melt continue, some models suggest that the Arctic Ocean could become near ice free in the summer time within one decade."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

To further confuse things, DMI records show practically identical total sea ice area measurements in the Arctic for the past five years. However, DMI qualifies its data, noting that the age and thickness of Arctic ice is changing dramatically and citing research from the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) in Colorado that Arctic sea ice is melting at a rate of 11.2 percent per decade. The NSIDC explains that more ice than usual has been melting in summer months during recent years. New ice cover is relatively thin, weak, and more vulnerable to melting. Remarking on the data, NSIDC Director Mark Serreze said, "We still expect to see ice-free summers sometime in the next few decades."

Arctic Conditions

All this ice loss must mean the Arctic is heating up, right? On the contrary, DMI admits little difference in Arctic temperatures between 1958 and 2009, and data from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) indicates a cooling trend in the Arctic since the 1940s. Indeed, some climate scientists--even those who support the idea of anthropogenic (human-caused) global warming (AGW)--are predicting Earth will experience a period of cooling for the next two or three decades.

A top climate modeler with the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Mojib Latif, said as much at last summer's UN World Climate Conference in Geneva. A confirmed adherent to AGW, Latif explained that cyclical changes in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans cause Earth's temperatures to fluctuate between warm and cold modes every 20 to 30 years. He said we are at the beginning of a cooling period. The head of climate prediction at the U.K.'s National Weather Service (the Met Office), James Murphy, agreed and added that ocean cycles are contributing factors in the loss of Arctic sea ice. "The oceans are key to decadal natural variability," Murphy said.

The head of the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Sciences Group, Anastasios Tsonis, supports Latif's findings with further evidence showing that global temperatures depend largely on oceanic "multi-decadal oscillations," or MDOs. Tsonis does not deny human activities can contribute to rising temperatures, but he disagrees they can affect climate in any significant way. In an interview with the U.K.'s Daily Mail, Tsonis explained that the latest MDO warm mode has brought on the global-warming hysteria of the past few years. Recalling ice-age predictions made in the 1970s, he said, "Perhaps we will see talk of an ice age again by the early 2030s, just as the MDOs shift once more and temperatures begin to rise."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

So what explains Arctic ice loss in the face of a cooling Earth? Oceanographer Jane Eert attributes much of it to shifting winds she blames on climate change. She says the winds have exported "enormous amounts of ice" from the area. Yet she made the amazing assertion:

  The guys who are running the long-term climate models have a tough
  problem. 

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