Being Beautiful, Inside and Out

Manila Bulletin, March 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

Being Beautiful, Inside and Out


When someone tells you that “you’re beautiful,” what does it really mean? Does it insinuate that you have a model-like svelte figure, or perhaps a curvaceous body with ample bosom and hips? Or maybe it’s about your flawless, zit-free face? Does being beautiful entail fair complexion, slim silhouette, and everything aesthetically physical? When it comes to beauty, is it really in the eye of the beholder? Are there objective criteria for the evaluation of beauty? Even before civilization started, human beings already have the concept of beauty. They possessed the ability to realize that some things are pleasing and attractive than others. But through time, the concept of beauty changed and even became more abstract. Women have endeavored to change their body to conform to what society dictates to be beautiful. Each culture has different beauty ideals. What may be considered beautiful to one might be appalling to another.Take for example the Kayan and Padaung tribes from the border region of Myanmar and Thailand. Since their early childhood, the women wear brass coils, or neck rings, to elongate their necks. The more elongated the neck, the more beautiful the woman is. In the late 19th century, the voluptuous and round-figured women were the standard of beauty. While in the 1920s, super thin flappers (new breed of young women during that era) were “in.” Curvaceous pin-up girls were in vogue during the 1940s to 1950s. Super-thin models made a comeback during the 1960s. Nowadays, although women still aspire to be skinny, the standard of beauty emphasizes on being healthy and toned. And it doesn’t help that most product advertisements have shifting messages about what is beautiful.Dove Philippines has helped shape the concept of beauty in its own way… in a good way, that is. For the past ten years, it has embarked on a serious and deliberate mission to inspire women to take another look at themselves as creations of natural and real beauty.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Being Beautiful, Inside and Out
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.