Science Push for Girls; Can Studying the Stars Be a Way of Getting Girls More Interested in Science? Rebekah Oruye Looks at the Growing Popularity of a New Course in Astronomy at One Birmingham School

The Birmingham Post (England), March 11, 2010 | Go to article overview

Science Push for Girls; Can Studying the Stars Be a Way of Getting Girls More Interested in Science? Rebekah Oruye Looks at the Growing Popularity of a New Course in Astronomy at One Birmingham School


Byline: Rebekah Oruye

Traditionally boys significantly outperform girls in science at schools across Britain.

The Government has already acknowledged that more must be done to encourage girls to take up science.

Recent figures by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) concluded that boys scored on average ten points higher in science tests than girls. So how does an all-girls school encourage its pupils into picking the subject beyond the compulsory studying age, with physics in particular struggling to get high interest from young female students? King Edwards VI High School in Edgbaston (KEHS) is trying to buck the trend by introducing a new GCSE - in astronomy. And gazing up at the stars and learning about the earth's place in the solar system seems to have drawn the curiosity of students.

Bringing the subject to the school was the brainchild of head of physics Dr Bernie Tedd.

Dr Tedd, himself an amateur astronomer, found out about teaching astronomy while at a meeting of the European Association for Astronomy held in the Canary Islands a few years ago.

He said interest in physics was relatively low at KEHS compared with biology and chemistry and decided to offer extra-curricular sessions in astronomy at lunchtimes and after school for pupils keen to find out about the earth and its place in the wider universe.

He said: "Interestingly, astronomy seems to capture their imagination amazingly. They associate the awe of the night sky with themselves whereas physics is a maleoriented subject."

"The nice thing about it, is that the new things you see in the newspapers like the discovery of dark matter, is accessible for them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Science Push for Girls; Can Studying the Stars Be a Way of Getting Girls More Interested in Science? Rebekah Oruye Looks at the Growing Popularity of a New Course in Astronomy at One Birmingham School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.