WORLD UNITES BEHIND UNITE; US, Oz and Germany Back BA Strike

The Mirror (London, England), March 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

WORLD UNITES BEHIND UNITE; US, Oz and Germany Back BA Strike


Byline: MARK ELLIS

THE three-day BA strike is set to escalate into a global dispute after powerful unions around the world vowed to back the walkout by 12,000 cabin crew.

Unite union leaders were yesterday in Washington DC for talks with America's massive Teamsters union.

Support has already come from Germany, Spain, Italy and Australia - countries where baggage handlers and ground staff could throw into chaos BA's plans to fly planes manned by strike-breakers.

Action by overseas unions could make it imposssible for planes to be refuelled, serviced, cleaned or supplied with food.

The Teamsters have 1.4million members - 40,000 in aviation. They control fuel deliveries to the biggest airports. The Teamsters said in a statement: "We stand in solidarity with our brothers and sisters at Unite who are fighting for a fair contract.''

In Germany, the union ver.di said it would offer Unite ''practical'' support and union bosses in Australia have also vowed to make it hard for strike-breaking volunteers to work in its airports. With the three-day strike - over pay and staffing levels - set to start on Saturday, hopes of a last-minute deal to call off action were fading fast.

Even the conciliation service Acas was forced to issue an unexpected statement, rebuking both sides for leaking details of last weekend's failed talks, which Gordon Brown had hoped would have provided a breakthrough. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

WORLD UNITES BEHIND UNITE; US, Oz and Germany Back BA Strike
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.