Institute for Behavioral Medicine Fulfills a Vital Community Need

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Institute for Behavioral Medicine Fulfills a Vital Community Need


Adventist GlenOaks Hospital is an integral part of the Adventist Institute for Behavioral Medicine, a regional center of excellence in mental health care. With locations at multiple hospitals and satellite facilities, the institute is the largest nonprofit behavioral health program in the Chicago suburbs.

The institute serves adolescents, adults and senior citizens who are experiencing emotional, physical, behavioral or addiction disorders. It offers a variety of services throughout DuPage County, including treatment options for debilitating conditions such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and dementia.

The multidisciplinary staff is comprised of board-certified psychiatrists and clinical psychologists, as well as addictionologists, social workers, nurses and counselors. In addition, it employs discharge planners who help patients assess the potential need for follow-up treatment after they leave.

No matter which location a patient visits, he or she can expect continuity and consistency because of the Institute's umbrella organization, said Clinical Director of Behavioral Services Christine Caddy, RN, MBA.

"One of the biggest advantages to the patient is they will receive the same assessment and referral services at each of our locations," Caddy said. "It will be more of a seamless process for our patients, and will expedite the service as well."

The services are organized as follows:

* Inpatient services for adult and geriatric

patients is available at Adventist GlenOaks Hospital, where two inpatient units recently underwent $1 million in renovations. …

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Institute for Behavioral Medicine Fulfills a Vital Community Need
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