World & Nation in 60 Seconds the World the Nation

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 25, 2010 | Go to article overview

World & Nation in 60 Seconds the World the Nation


Runaway rail cars kill three:

OSLO -- Sixteen runaway train cars careened downhill for three miles and crashed into a port building Wednesday, killing three workers, before two of the cars plunged into the water. The empty train cars broke loose from a cargo train and slammed into the port terminal on the edge of the Oslo fjord, destroying the building, police and railroad officials said.

Pirate killed in shootout:

NAIROBI, Kenya -- The European Union Naval Force says private security guards aboard a merchant ship off the coast of East Africa fired on and killed a Somali pirate after a group of pirates attacked their vessel. EU Naval Force spokesman Cmdr. John Harbour said Wednesday the killing of the pirate is believed to be the first by a private security team.

Irish bishop resigns:

VATICAN CITY -- Pope Benedict XVI on Wednesday accepted the resignation of Irish Bishop John Magee in the country's sex abuse scandal. The 73-year-old Magee has been accused of mishandling complaints against priests in his diocese of Cloyne.

Lawmakers receive threats:

WASHINGTON -- House Democratic leaders on Wednesday said they are concerned about the personal safety of lawmakers because of threats linked to intense opposition to the health care overhaul law. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said the FBI and Capitol Police briefed Democrats on how to handle perceived security threats and that those who feel they are at risk will be "getting attention from the proper authorities." Hoyer said more than 10 Democratic lawmakers have reported incidents.

Carnage continues in town:

LOS ANGELES -- Four municipal trucks were set ablaze in a rural Riverside County town plagued by bizarre booby trap attempts to kill police officers, and authorities said Wednesday the fire may be linked to the earlier attacks. In the past week or so, officers have received threats daily, either on their nonemergency telephone lines or via e-mail.

New human species found?

NEW YORK -- In the latest use of DNA to investigate the story of humankind, scientists have decoded genetic material from an unidentified human ancestor that lived in Siberia and concluded it might be a new member of the human family tree. The DNA doesn't match modern humans or Neanderthals, two species that lived in that area around the same time -- 30,000 to 50,000 years ago. Instead, it suggests the Siberian species lineage split off from the branch leading to moderns and Neanderthals a million years ago, the researchers calculated.

Bill alters school food rules:

WASHINGTON -- Legislation approved Wednesday by the Senate Agriculture Committee would allow the Agriculture Department to create new standards for all foods in schools, including vending machine items, to give students healthier meal options. …

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