The Impact of Fantasy Football Participation on NFL Attendance

By Nesbit, Todd M.; King, Kerry A. | Atlantic Economic Journal, March 2010 | Go to article overview

The Impact of Fantasy Football Participation on NFL Attendance


Nesbit, Todd M., King, Kerry A., Atlantic Economic Journal


Introduction

The fantasy sports industry has seen tremendous growth in both popularity and market size over the past decade. The Fantasy Sports Trade Association (FSTA) estimates that the fantasy sports industry is currently generating $2 billion dollars in revenue per year and that the number of people who play fantasy sports online has risen to more than 18 million people in the United States as of 2007. Fantasy sports leagues have been developed for all of the major sports, including football, baseball, basketball, hockey, and automobile racing. However, football has emerged as the most popular fantasy sport with over five times as many unique users of fantasy football sites, compared with users of fantasy baseball sites. (1)

For those unfamiliar with fantasy football, league participants conduct a draft prior to the start of the season in which exclusive "ownership" of real-life players is established. League rules establish a maximum number of players and generally require participants to play 1-2 quarterbacks, 2-3 wide receivers, 2-3 running backs, 1 tight end, 1 kicker, and a team defense. Each week before game day participants must decide who to play and who to bench. Participants can also make roster changes by trading with other league participants or by dropping players and acquiring new players from the flee agency (those players not claimed by other league participants).

Points are awarded based on the performance of each player in the starting lineup. Quarterbacks typically receive points for passing yards and touchdowns, wide receivers and tight-ends earn points for reception yardage and touchdowns, running backs receive points for yardage gained and touchdowns, kickers receive points for field goals, and so on. For head-to-head leagues, fantasy participants are matched up against one other participant for each week (in a round-robin structure), and the participant with the most points earns a win for that week. The win-loss record of the teams ultimately determines the league champion. (2)

While some leagues charge an entry fee for each participant and award the majority of that money to the league champion, most leagues are free to play, which means that people participate just for the thrill of competition. In either case, league participants generally spend a significant amount of time throughout the week researching players and teams in order to increase the likelihood of a win. For instance, the FSTA reports that active fantasy players spend an average of three hours per week thinking about their teams, indicating that managing a successful fantasy football team requires much more than just drafting players and sitting back to watch how the team performs. Many aspects of the game, such as injuries, trades, acquisitions, bye weeks, and various match-up scenarios, are integrated into fantasy play. The numerous websites offering fantasy advice for a fee are good indicators of just how much time and effort is put into managing a winning team each week.

Given the amount of time and attention put into managing a fantasy football team, fantasy participants often become more knowledgeable of the National Football League (NFL) than the average fan and are therefore arguably more involved in the sport. While the majority of NFL fans have a favorite team and are highly familiar with the players on that team (and maybe that team's rival), they are not as knowledgeable of the players on other teams with the exception of star players, such as Tom Brady and LaDainian Tomlinson. This is generally not the case for fantasy football participants. Joining a fantasy football league provides the incentive to become familiar and more knowledgeable of all of the athletes in the NFL, not just the ones on a favorite (and rival) team. Fantasy participants must be highly aware of players on all teams (including back-up players in case of an injury to the starter) if they expect to be a successful fantasy team manager. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Impact of Fantasy Football Participation on NFL Attendance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.