Try to Hit These Curves

By Will, George F. | Newsweek, April 5, 2010 | Go to article overview

Try to Hit These Curves


Will, George F., Newsweek


Byline: George F. Will

Explain the putout that was scored 8-8.

This column does not grade on the curve but believes that those--you know who you were--who flunked last spring's baseball quiz deserve a do-over. So:

1. Who pitched three no-hitters and 12 one-hitters?

2. Which pitcher had 107 wins by age 23?

3. Which pitcher won the most games in the 1950s?

4. Who was the youngest pitcher to win the American League ERA title?

5. Who is the only pitcher to win a 14-inning complete World Series game?

6. Which Hall of Famer hit his only home run in the first at-bat of his 21-season career?

7. In 1942 Ted Williams won the Triple Crown (batting average, home runs, RBIs) but lost the MVP vote. To whom?

8. In 1949 Williams would have won the Triple Crown had he not lost the batting title by .00016 to which Hall of Famer?

9. Who is the only player to appear in the World Series with four different franchises?

10. Which contemporary of Willie Mays and Hank Aaron exceeded them in career batting average, on-base percentage, and slugging percentage?

11. Who is the only player to steal at least 70 bases in six consecutive seasons?

12. Who is the only player to lead his league, or tie for the lead, in home runs for seven consecutive seasons?

13. Who played on five World Series-winning teams in his first five seasons?

14. Who managed three different teams in the World Series?

15. Who struck out a record 10 consecutive batters?

16. Who pitched 33? consecutive scoreless World Series innings?

17. Who was the youngest pitcher to toss a World Series shutout?

18. Who got the most hits in the 1950s? Who hit the most home runs in the 1950s? Who drove in the most runs in the 1950s? Who played for a World Series winner and an NBA winner in the 1950s? Which pitcher had six consecutive 20-win seasons in the 1950s?

19. Name the pitcher who, commenting on giving up a record 505 home runs, said: "I served up home run balls to Negroes, Italians, Jews, Catholics alike. Race, creeds, nationality made no difference to me."

20. Who is the only person to be named Rookie of the Year, MVP, World Series MVP, and All-Star Game MVP? …

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