It's Open Season for Job Hunting

Manila Bulletin, March 30, 2010 | Go to article overview

It's Open Season for Job Hunting


After long, exhausting years of hard work in school, you have finally graduated and are very eager to take on the real world and enter the workforce.But before you embark on job hunting, make sure that you know what to look for, and where to find not just any job but one that matches your skills and competencies.Loree Cruz-Mante, human resources and organization development practitioner, and career consultant at a transitions management firm called DBM, says job hunting follows a structured process and has its own set of rules.“The interesting thing about job search is that it has the elements of both science and art. It includes scientific processes, such as research and rational decision-making. Its artistic elements include creativity, innovation, and marketing sense. Add to that the elements of luck, fate, destiny, purpose and mission,” Mante explains.Moreover, new graduates should first learn the basics of job search before they take the plunge, to make them better prepared, according to Vicente Kilayko, DBM managing director and chairman of the Academic Industry Committee of the Personnel Management Association of the Philippines (PMAP).“The wrong way is the shotgun approach which is typically sending your resume to as many companies as possible. What we teach is a more focused approach. Graduates should know their career assets, their skills and competencies, and focus exactly on what they want to achieve, then prepare for it,” Kilayko explains.Below, our career experts listed down some tried and tested tips to help graduates find the job of their dreams.1. IDENTIFY THE CAREER YOU REALLY WANT TO PURSUE.Ideally, self-assessment should be done while the applicant is still in school, preferably before he or she enters college.Kilayko says they should personally choose the course they want to take up instead of their parents and peers. The career should be relevant to the time when the student graduates. They should be able to look ahead and think ahead. Know what new industries will boom at the time they start looking for a job.2. MAKE YOUR RESUME A RECORD OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND NOT AN EXTENSION OF YOUR REPORT CARD.While an impressive academic record helps in job hunting, what will actually make you land that job are the accomplishments you’ve achieved in your extra-curricular activities.Kilayko says some applicants often think that being a working student, the leader of a church choir, or the team captain of a barangay basketball team are insignificant facts that are not worth mentioning in a resume or job interview. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It's Open Season for Job Hunting
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.