Mobile Technology, Driving Change and Opportunity in Developing Countries: Mobile Technology Is Changing the World More Quickly and Profoundly Than Any Other Innovation. in Emerging Markets the Scale of Uptake and the Impact on Local Communities Are Too Important to Be Ignored

By Lambeek, Alex | International Trade Forum, July-September 2009 | Go to article overview

Mobile Technology, Driving Change and Opportunity in Developing Countries: Mobile Technology Is Changing the World More Quickly and Profoundly Than Any Other Innovation. in Emerging Markets the Scale of Uptake and the Impact on Local Communities Are Too Important to Be Ignored


Lambeek, Alex, International Trade Forum


In Kolhapur, a hub of India's lucrative textile industry, a local textile agent is using mobile technology to increase efficiency and maintain a competitive edge. Nikhil Gadhia inputs a shopkeeper's order--three bales of cotton--into his phone, then presses send. He receives a text message from the manufacturer confirming his order is being processed. This reduces the amount of paperwork and administration and enhances efficiency of the whole order, distribution and sales management process. This easy-to-use software makes communication faster and more reliable. While this is just the beginning, it reveals the potential of technology to those who work across the whole spectrum of creative industries.

Most of us take the convenience of using a mobile phone for granted, but for billions of people, mobile devices and services can transform their lives. A recent study reported that adding an extra ten mobile phones per 100 people in a typical developing country boosts economic growth in gross domestic product per person by 0.8 percentage points. People in emerging markets are using mobile technology in more powerful ways than those in the developed world. Their first-ever Internet experience will be on a mobile phone and services like mobile email are seeing some of their highest adoption rates in developing countries.

In 2000 developing countries accounted for around one-quarter of the world's 700 million mobile phones. By the beginning of 2009 that share had grown to three-quarters of a total that by then had risen to over 4 billion. This has fundamentally altered the mobile telecommunications industry, with the biggest changes taking place in developing countries.

By 2015, 83 per cent of the global population is expected to be living in emerging markets. As incomes in developing countries rise, household spending on mobile phones is growing faster than spending on energy, water or other necessities. Telecom analysts Juniper Research predict that 80 per cent or more of all new mobile phone subscribers each year will come from emerging markets.

Increased access to mobile technology in developing countries is having a profound impact on every business sector including the creative industries. From film (see Pangea Day box), music and art to literature, digital animation and advertising--all have the potential to reap the benefits of mobile phone technology and improve the lives of people working in those sectors.

Adapting to the challenges

Offering consumers relevant and localized services is critical, but they must also be affordable. The total cost of ownership of mobile devices and services remains far too high in many markets and is the most significant barrier to uptake. To reach emerging markets and drive further take-up of mobile communications, services must be accessible, relevant and affordable. Therefore, the key to improving access for emerging markets lies in reducing the cost of not just the handsets, but also the other costs associated with mobile phones.

It is also vital for telecommunications companies to recognize that every market is different. Just like the developed world, each market in developing countries is unique. Each country is governed by its own ethics and environment, so it is crucial to understand that a single approach to services and technology offerings will not suit all markets. The need to work within each to find locally relevant solutions is critical. Whether offering mobile devices with flashlights and extended battery life in regions where electricity is scarce or using durable materials for harsh climates and remote conditions, innovation and adaptability are required.

Business solutions beyond voice

In developing countries, new mobile technologies such as data services, mobile phone-based agriculture and business advice, health care and money transfer are providing enormous economic and development benefits. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mobile Technology, Driving Change and Opportunity in Developing Countries: Mobile Technology Is Changing the World More Quickly and Profoundly Than Any Other Innovation. in Emerging Markets the Scale of Uptake and the Impact on Local Communities Are Too Important to Be Ignored
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.