An Antidote to Foreign Policy Charade; Gingrich Prescribes a Sobering History Lesson

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 15, 2010 | Go to article overview

An Antidote to Foreign Policy Charade; Gingrich Prescribes a Sobering History Lesson


Byline: Suzanne Fields, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Pedestrians in Washington have to be a patient lot. The Nuclear Security Summit was a big deal for President Obama and the visiting heads of state, but for everyone else, it was only an opportunity to watch diplomats speeding down the avenues in big black rented limousines, trying to look important. They were in Washington to talk about ways to put nuclear weapons under lock and key, but it's hard to find anyone who thinks it was anything more than big talk.

Newt Gingrich, the former speaker of the House and Republican gadfly-in-chief, is one of the harshest skeptics of Mr. Obama's show and tell. A small group of journalists and economic and foreign-policy conservatives braved the traffic gridlock to take breakfast with him in the midst of summit week and listen to his reasons why it was not the good day that the patient and polite traffic cops were going out of their way to wish impatient pedestrians.

Mr. Gingrich provided his usual whirlwind of words, food for thought and for more than a little indigestion. Mr. Obama's summit, he said, was a charade. He saw it as a craftily staged play in the theater of the absurd, a fantasy of foreign policy in a time and place that demands reality.

Always the well-prepared college professor (which indeed he once was) he compared the two-day summit to the endless disarmament talks in Geneva in the 1920s. He recalled the Kellogg-Briand Pact, which sounds like a box of breakfast cereal but actually was a worthless piece of paper that was supposed to end war. Fifteen nations signed it initially, and the number grew to 50, including Germany. We know how that turned out. The U.S. Senate confirmed it with only one dissenting vote, and the men who put the pact together each won the Nobel Peace Prize. Kellogg-Briand was meaningless as a defense against aggression, but it made a lot of people feel good about the prospects for peace. Events soon would demonstrate the difference between peace and peace. Mr. Gingrich thinks there's a lessons here for today.

But if Mr. Obama's foreign policy is the absurd theater Mr. Gingrich says it is, the president's domestic agenda is a contraption that could have been created by Hollywood director James Cameron, the master of the images of the man-machine hybrid. You could call the movie The Determinator. The title of Mr. Gingrich's latest book, due next month, is To Save America: Stopping Obama's Secular Socialist Machine. …

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