'Apprentice' Dims Glow of Celebrity

By Capitano, Laura | The Florida Times Union, April 18, 2010 | Go to article overview

'Apprentice' Dims Glow of Celebrity


Capitano, Laura, The Florida Times Union


Byline: LAURA CAPITANO

I thought I was done looking at Donald Trump and his bottom teeth, but my semi-embarrassing fondness for former Poison frontman Bret Michaels got me roped into watching the second season of "Celebrity Apprentice."

Since Michaels is hanging tough in carrying out the Trumped-up marketing task assigned each episode, I've had a chance to study the celebrities' behavior across several shows. While it's true that reality programs are apart from documentary television, with loose standards regarding editing and production trickery, the stars, ranging from former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich to Cyndi Lauper, still manage to show their true colors when under the gun of a Trump-induced deadline. I hate to throw anyone under the bus, as we say in reality show terms, but most of the behavior in question detracts from the stars' light rather than adds to it.

Baseball hero Darryl Strawberry brought little but ennui with him for his brief "Celebrity Apprentice" association. He chose to use valuable task time to smoke cigarettes and sit around and yawn. And the whining that came from that guy! The on-camera lamenting about the pressure of a reality TV gig, having to get up before noon and the corresponding exhaustion.

In Strawberry's last blaze of boardroom glory, he confessed to Trump to being the least valuable player on the men's team and that he deserved to be fired - actions akin to quitting toddler tantrum-style by "Apprentice" standards.

And then there's the magenta-headed Sharon Osbourne and her pesky phlegm. …

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