Obama Implores Wall Street; Senate Nears Deadline on Financial Reform Bill

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 22, 2010 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Obama Implores Wall Street; Senate Nears Deadline on Financial Reform Bill


Byline: Kara Rowland, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

With the Senate now facing a Monday deadline to take up a financial-regulation bill, President Obama on Thursday traveled to Wall Street's backyard to plead with bankers to stop fighting his efforts and get on board with tougher rules aimed at preventing another financial meltdown.

As Mr. Obama stepped up his cheerleading efforts before a crowd at New York's Cooper Union, the Senate continued negotiations over the overhaul. Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, has scheduled a procedural vote for Monday over the protests of several Senate Republicans, who said they were nearing agreement on the legislation with Senate banking committee Chairman Christopher J. Dodd, Connecticut Democrat and the bill's author.

Mr. Obama said he supports the nation's free-market system but warned that new curbs are needed for the good of consumers and businesses. He said legislation must give regulators the power to break up troubled firms, ensure that financial products such as derivatives are traded in public, protect customers from being duped and give more power for shareholders to dictate the terms of compensation and elections of executives.

The president stayed away from telling senators how to achieve those objectives. It's the same tactic he took on health care, in which he set out overarching goals but left the legislative minutiae to Congress.

Mr. Obama reiterated Thursday that he supports the nation's free-market system but said it needs common-sense curbs that would benefit businesses and consumers.

I believe in the power of the free market. I believe in a strong financial sector that helps people to raise capital and get loans and invest their savings, Mr. Obama told the audience, which included union leaders, regulators and elected officials. But a free market was never meant to be a free license to take whatever you can get, however you can get it. That's what happened too often in the years leading up to this crisis.

Mr. Obama's remarks were not as provocative as they have been in the past - such as when he referred to bankers as fat cats - but he chided Wall Street for forgetting that behind every dollar traded or leveraged, there is a family looking to buy a house, pay for an education, open a business or save for retirement.

Republicans argue that Mr. Dodd's $50 billion liquidation fund, to be financed by a fee on the nation's biggest banks, means the government is still on the hook to bail out big banks.

Mr. Obama said the argument makes for a good sound bite but is not factually accurate.

The Senate bill, though it does not go as far as a House bill that passed last year, generally would give the government more power to break up troubled firms and create a consumer-protection entity inside the Federal Reserve.

The White House and Senate Democrats have been looking for Republican backers of the bill because they need at least one member of the GOP to join their 59 votes to overcome procedural hurdles.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Obama Implores Wall Street; Senate Nears Deadline on Financial Reform Bill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?