Migraine


A migraine headache is a vascular headache that involves the excessive dilation or contraction of the brain's blood vessels. There are two types of migraine - common and classic. The common migraine occurs slowly, producing a throbbing pain that may last for two to 72 hours. The pain is severe and is often centered at the temple or behind the ear. Alternatively, it can begin at the back of the head and spread to one entire side of the head (the word "migraine" comes from the greek word "hemicrania," which means "half skull.") It is usually accompanied by nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, and tingling and numbness in the limbs that can last up to 18 hours.

A classic migraine is similar to a common migraine, but it is preceeded by a set of symptoms referred to as an aura, which can consist of speech disorders, weakness, and disturbances in the senses of vision and/or smell.

Who gets migraine?

Migraine, which usually starts during the teenage years or in early adult life, affects approximately 10 percent of the population. It affects more women than men - the ratio is 3:1. At least 90 percent of the population with migraine have their first attack before the age of 40. For most people, the migraine starts during their teens or early 20s. It is rare for migraine to start in people over the age of 50.

Triggering factors

Although doctors do not know why people get migraine, it is known that certain factors are involved in triggering an attack. Most people have read or been told that they should avoid cheese, chocolate, and red wine if they have migraine.

Unfortunately, for most people simply avoiding certain food is insufficient to prevent the attacks.

Twenty percent of sufferers link certain foods to their migraine. The most common foods are chocolates, cheese, citrus fruits, commonly referred to as three C's. Alcohol, particularly red wine, is also a recognized trigger.Missing meals, snack or eating sugary snacks instead of a proper meal can all lead to an attack. Breakfast is a particularly important meal.Changes in sleep pattern - sleepless nights, overwork and too many late nights can result in becoming over-tired and may trigger a migraine.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Migraine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.