Summary of the First International Conference on Business and Economics: Organized by IJEB and Serials Publications, at the Hotel Hans, New Delhi, India

Indian Journal of Economics and Business, March 2010 | Go to article overview

Summary of the First International Conference on Business and Economics: Organized by IJEB and Serials Publications, at the Hotel Hans, New Delhi, India


From December 19 to December 21, 2009, conference rooms at the Hotel Hans, 15 Barakhanmba Road, New Delhi, were crowded due to presentations and speeches delivered for the First International Conference on Business and Economic Issues organized by Serials Publications, New Delhi and IJEB, Denver, Colorado, USA. While representatives from the US (around 25) and India (around 55) dominated the attendance, they also came from 9 other countries. The program featured 92 presentations in roughly 20 sessions that started early morning at 9 AM and went up to 5 PM.

The first day's program began with introductory remarks by Prof. Bansi Sawhney, Co-editor, IJEB. He argued for the need for more conferences in this format as globalization and free trade have contributed to significant economic growth in recent times. His presentation included discussion of the current economic situation as well as the history of IJEB since its conception to its present status. He then introduced Prof. Kishore G. Kulkarni who welcomed all delegates and announced changes in the structural organization of IJEB. He thanked all of the helpful staff of Serials Publications, New Delhi, and especially recognized Mr. S.K. Jha and his sons Mr. Vijay and Vinay Kumar Jha for their outstanding help in local arrangements. Prof. Kulkarni also introduced Dr. Subramanian Swamy, Harvard Professor and former Minister of Commerce, Law and Industry for the Government of India. Dr. Swamy in his informative address covered the wide range of India-China growth prospects and answered questions from the audience. In the afternoon sessions, research papers were presented by numerous researchers on many different business and economic issues. The first day of exhaustive but informative gathering ended at around 6 PM.

On December 20th, the morning sessions were organized for 90 minutes each with snacks, boiling hot tea and coffee breaks. Session presenters were reminded of the time limits. Lively discussion followed in all sessions and active member of the audience had a few constructive comments on almost every paper. The luncheon session started after a stupendous array of lunch menu that consisted of eastern as well as western delicacies. Dr. Bimal Jalan, former Governor of the Reserve Bank of India, eloquently summarized the need for improvements in polity as well as the administration in Indian institutions.

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