Eva Hesse: CAMDEN ARTS CENTRE

By Schwabsky, Barry | Artforum International, April 2010 | Go to article overview

Eva Hesse: CAMDEN ARTS CENTRE


Schwabsky, Barry, Artforum International


Marcel Duchamp marked a historical rupture when he spoke of wanting to make works that are not "of art"; on the other hand, artists have always produced (or can I say "by-produced"?) art that does not quite amount to works. Painters used to call such things sketches, and rigorously distinguished them from finished works. For example, the ravishing plein air oil sketches that Corot produced in Italy in the 1830s, now so highly valued in part because they seem to point the way to Impressionism and beyond, would never have been exhibited or openly sold in the artist's lifetime, even if they circulated extensively among artists. They were exercises intended, as scholar Jeremy Strick says, to "capture the experience of a specific and contingent moment rather than the precise details of a determined form," but they were also part of a practice premised on the overriding importance of finished works.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In part because Eva Hesse's career was so painfully short and her mature canon so small, there has always been a lively interest in those manifestations of the tentative, the exploratory, and the unfinished in her work that I would call three-dimensional sketches but which art historian Briony Fer prefers to call "Studiowork." The current traveling exhibition, which originated at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh last year (and of which Fer is cocurator, along with Barry Rosen, director of the Estate of Eva Hesse), is, however, the first to focus on this aspect of her production. (The show will travel to the Fundacio Antoni Tapies, Barcelona; Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; and the University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.) Fer's accompanying book is a signal contribution to the burgeoning literature on the artist--perhaps the most important single contribution since Lucy Lippard's pioneering monograph of 1976. Yet in the face of the mutely expressive, itchily inert objects themselves, Fer's scrupulously tentative ruminations leave me in doubt.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Eva Hesse: CAMDEN ARTS CENTRE
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.