Feast of Saints Philip and James, Apostles

Manila Bulletin, May 2, 2010 | Go to article overview

Feast of Saints Philip and James, Apostles


We celebrate today (Monday) the Feast of Saints Philip and James who, according to the Gospels, belong to the first-generation disciples of Jesus Christ and are actually part of "The Twelve," the closest collaborators of Our Lord in His earthly ministry.

Evangelist John presents Philip as a disciple from the city of Bethsaida, the same place where Andrew and Philip originated. Philip was instrumental in the inclusion of Nathaniel (sometimes called Bartholomew) to their group. Philip was the one who introduced him to Jesus (John 20:45-47).

The Gospel of today tells us that it was Philip who asked Jesus: "Lord, show us the Father, and we shall be satisfied." And Jesus replied with these words still relevant to us today: "Have I been with you so long, and yet you do not know Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; how can you say, 'Show us the Father?' Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father in Me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on My own authority; but the Father who dwells in Me does His works. Believe Me that I am in the Father and the Father in Me; or else believe Me for the sake of the works themselves. …

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