Caveats to Authority

By Way, Lucan A. | Harvard International Review, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

Caveats to Authority


Way, Lucan A., Harvard International Review


In his Winter 2010 article "Authoritarianism after 1989: From Regime Types to Transnational Processes," Professor Jason Brownlee incisively points to the transnational character of authoritarianism. Indeed, while the end of the Cold War stimulated numerous studies of the ways in which external factors (such as diffusion, the spread of information technology, international NGOs, and bilateral and multilateral conditionality) promote democracy, scholars have only recently begun to examine how post-Cold War transnational forces may facilitate non-democratic rule. Brownlee draws attention to the frequent collusion between democratic and authoritarian states, a phenomenon rarely discussed in scholarly literature on regimes.

But he could have also noted the increasing cooperation among authoritarian regimes. Thus, the last decade witnessed a remarkable pushback by emerging regional powers such as Russia and Venezuela against Western democracy promotion. Venezuela has aided autocratic governments in Nicaragua and Cuba, while Russia has provided significant assistance to autocrats in Armenia, Belarus, and Ukraine. In addition, election monitors from non-democracies became increasingly assertive in blessing patently corrupt elections. Further, Andrew Wilson has pointed to the widespread use of Russian "political technologists" to help authoritarian leaders win semi-free elections throughout the former Soviet Union in the 2000s. Russian leaders have demonstrated adeptness in launching cyber attacks against countries such as Estonia and Georgia and spreading rumors both at home and abroad about politicians detested by the government.

At the same time, the impact of the "authoritarian international" should not be exaggerated. Such dynamics rarely supersede country-level factors in explaining regime outcomes in most parts of the world. For example, in Ukraine in 2004, the Kuchma regime fell despite receiving far greater assistance from the Kremlin than the opposition got from the West. In the most recent presidential elections in February, a pro-Russian candidate won only because the Kremlin gave its support to both major candidates. Perhaps most remarkably, Mikhail Saakashvili of Georgia (a country 30 times smaller than Russia) has survived in power for seven years in the face of enormous Russian hostility--including significant increases in energy prices, a virtual economic blockade, and military invasion in 2008. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Caveats to Authority
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.