Parties Get to the Art of the Matter; Politicians Often Use Theatrical Terms to Enhance the Grandeur of Their Speeches. They Are 'Players on the World Stage', Ludicrous Situations Are Refereed to as 'Political Pantomime', Foolish MPs Are 'Court Jesters'. but When It Comes to the General Election, Says Daily Post Arts Editor Laura Davis, the Parties' Emphasis on Arts and Culture Is Mixed

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), May 4, 2010 | Go to article overview

Parties Get to the Art of the Matter; Politicians Often Use Theatrical Terms to Enhance the Grandeur of Their Speeches. They Are 'Players on the World Stage', Ludicrous Situations Are Refereed to as 'Political Pantomime', Foolish MPs Are 'Court Jesters'. but When It Comes to the General Election, Says Daily Post Arts Editor Laura Davis, the Parties' Emphasis on Arts and Culture Is Mixed


Byline: Laura Davis

LABOUR dedicates an entire section of its manifesto to Communities and Creative Britain, stating the challenge for the country is to "build on the renaissance that British sport, culture and the arts have enjoyed in the last decade" despite being in a new period of financial restraint.

They promise operational independence for major museums and galleries, with new legislation ensuring that more managerial and financial decisions in venues such as the Walker Art Gallery and World Museum Liverpool, are made by the institutions themselves.

They also plan to give greater access to works of art from the national collection, which means we could see exhibitions of major artists in Merseyside that red tape would currently make difficult to curate.

Monument conservation body English Heritage, which looks after Beeston Castle, in Cheshire, will be reviewed to give the public a greater say in the future of the nation's built historical legacy.

Labour is also promising to build on the scheme operated by the National Theatre that provides reduced-rate theatre tickets. The Liverpool Everyman and Playhouse are participants in a similar scheme, A Night Less Ordinary, which is funded by the Arts Council.

CONSERVATIVES THE word "culture" is mentioned just three times in the Tories' manifesto, Invitation to Join the Government of Great Britain, usually referring to the "cultural change in society" needed to tackle "Broken Britain".

There is no section on the arts, although they do promise to restore the 20% National Lottery good cause money to sports, heritage and the arts.

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Parties Get to the Art of the Matter; Politicians Often Use Theatrical Terms to Enhance the Grandeur of Their Speeches. They Are 'Players on the World Stage', Ludicrous Situations Are Refereed to as 'Political Pantomime', Foolish MPs Are 'Court Jesters'. but When It Comes to the General Election, Says Daily Post Arts Editor Laura Davis, the Parties' Emphasis on Arts and Culture Is Mixed
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