Vouchers to Spend on University Research 'Vital for Welsh Firms' Call for a Scheme to Improve Links and Cut Bureaucracy

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), May 6, 2010 | Go to article overview

Vouchers to Spend on University Research 'Vital for Welsh Firms' Call for a Scheme to Improve Links and Cut Bureaucracy


Byline: Graham Henry

VOUCHERS to encourage innovative partnerships between small businesses and higher education have been urged as "vital" to help small business develop research links.

Innovation vouchers have already been in widespread use in English regions, where vouchers of typically up to pounds 5,000 can be granted to a business to invest in university research.

A Universities UK survey has revealed that 88% of English higher education institutions said that the scheme had fostered new relationships with SMEs and 86% said it had stimulated future collaborations.

Just under three quarters of institutions (72%) thought that it was helpful that the scheme was run on a regional level. The voucher entitles businesses to purchase specialist consultancy up to a certain value. Regional development agencies across Europe have adopted the scheme but it has yet to be implemented by the Welsh Assembly Government (WAG). Advocates of the scheme have said that it provides links between higher education facilities and business with less bureaucracy.

David Rosser, chief executive of CBI Wales, said: "We think they are a great idea and will be calling for them to be introduced in our response to the WAG economic renewal consultation. "It puts individual companies in touch with individual institutions. It is about giving both sides a reason to work together and hopefully kick off a long-standing relationship."

CBI Wales previously affirmed its support for the vouchers in a report from the Enterprise and Learning Committee last year, saying that the scheme was a good way of tackling the "challenge" of getting funding from SMEs.

But when questioned on whether Welsh SMEs should be free to redeem their vouchers in institutions outside of Wales, Mr Rosser said that it was a "good question" and an "important issue for debate."

He said: "There are certainly tensions on this issue that need addressed - but if a Welsh company were to spend the money on a Welsh university you get a double benefit - especially as Welsh institutions are not getting as much cash as their English counterparts.

"There are clear benefits to be derived if you spend it locally."

Russell Lawson, of the Federation of Small Businesses in Wales, said that the voucher schemes would be welcome as a way of "raising the profile of innovation between businesses and higher education". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Vouchers to Spend on University Research 'Vital for Welsh Firms' Call for a Scheme to Improve Links and Cut Bureaucracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.