Procrastinator's Guide to Summer

Sunset, May 2010 | Go to article overview

Procrastinator's Guide to Summer


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

DILEMMA 1

I don't have a single reservation at a national park.
Where can I still go?

STRATEGY            WHERE TO GO       WHAT TO EXPECT    INFO

Think urban. There  Rocky Mountain    Trail Ridge Road  $2o/vehicle
are lots of great   National Park,    is the highest    entrance fee;
parks near cities   an hour from      paved highway in  nps.gov/romo
(i.e., avail able   Boulder, CO       the U.S. and
hotel rooms)                          spans the.
                                      Continental
                                      Divide: In 48
                                      miles, you'll
                                      drive from
                                      wetlands to
                                      alpine areas,
                                      with staggering
                                      views to boot

Find a smart        Kings Canyon      Towering granite  $2o/vehicle
alternative to the  National Park     Sierra Nevada     entrance fee;
big guns            (aka Not          peaks, alpine     nps.gov/seki
                    Yosemite), two    meadows, a
                    hours east of     dramatic canyon,
                    Fresno, CA        and--wait for
                                      it--1/6th as
                                      many visitors as
                                      Yosemite

Pick a park with    Olympic National  Look at the       $15/vehicle
oodles of lodging   Park, west of     photo! Rain       entrance fee,
                    Seattle           forests,          nps.gov/oly
                                      beaches, sea
                                      stacks, and 4
                                      in-park lodges
                                      that often can
                                      be booked a few
                                      weeks out

DILEMMA 2

Is it true you can't visit Alaska in summer unless you plan a year in advance?

Not true. The average booking window for a trip to Alaska is five months, according to the Alaska Travel Industry Association, but you can often snag a cruise cabin weeks before the departure date. If you want to stay in Denali National Park, with its limited lodging options, it's probably best to book for 2011 now, but for this summer, think about Denali State Park, which has camping in the park and nearby lodges like Mt. McKinley Princess Wilderness Lodge. Even the most planning-averse travelers should be able to find a hotel room in Anchorage, Juneau, or Fairbanks and take day trips: You can visit the Mendenhall Glacier from Juneau, float the Placer River from Anchorage, or explore Chena Hot Springs from Fair banks. travelalaska.com

DILEMMA 3

What summer events should I book now, before it's too late? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Procrastinator's Guide to Summer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.