Nero Was Hotter Than Al Gore; National Academy of Science Study: Ancient Times Were Warmer

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 19, 2010 | Go to article overview

Nero Was Hotter Than Al Gore; National Academy of Science Study: Ancient Times Were Warmer


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The planet has never been warmer than it is right now, if you believe what global warming alarmists have to say. Mankind's selfishness in producing excessive amounts of carbon dioxide has set us on a path toward global cataclysm, they insist. The problem with this tale is that it neither fits with the historical record nor with a growing body of scientific evidence.

The alarmists must imagine that 50 years before the birth of Christ, men like Julius Caesar spent their summers strolling the streets of Rome wearing sweaters to guard against catching a chill - instead of abandoning the sweltering capital in favor of temperate seaside villas. A study published in the March 8 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science casts further doubt on the warmist premise by concluding that the sun beat down more harshly on the Caesars than it did on anyone else in the past 2,000 years.

Instead of using tree rings as a proxy for air temperature, the study's authors extracted data from sea shells preserved in deep sedimentary layers, using them as a proxy for sea temperature in the North Atlantic over the course of two millennia. According to the study, the reconstructed water temperatures for the Roman Warm Period in Iceland are higher than any temperatures recorded in modern times. The heat lasted from approximately 230 B.C. to 140 A.D. After that, temperatures rose and fell over time with a second peak taking place during the better-known Medieval Warm Period.

The researchers confirmed their temperature estimates against records of human settlement patterns and descriptions found in Norse sagas and other historical writings.

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