Obamanomics Fails Women and Families; Health Care Reform Costs Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 17, 2010 | Go to article overview

Obamanomics Fails Women and Families; Health Care Reform Costs Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg


Byline: Janice Shaw Crouse, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Under the Obama administration, the Democrats are unleashing a bevy of unpalatable surprises for women, including massive up-front government expansions and enormous tax increases that produce problems for American women and their families. As Rep. Michele Bachmann, Minnesota Republican, recently said, The government now owns 51 percent of the private sector. In just 18 months, the current administration has produced extraordinary change ; indeed, it threatens a huge transformation of America. The majority of citizens not only disapprove of these changes and transformations, they actively oppose them. Citizens have picketed, protested, held town hall meetings to express their opposition, and responded to poll after poll indicating their overwhelming opposition to the actions of the Democrat majority and the socialist agenda of the president.

Yuval Levin called the new law a ghastly mess and traced its development: It began as a badly misguided technocratic pipe dream and was then degraded into ruinous incoherence by the madcap process of its enactment.

Controversy and secrecy surrounded the passage of Obamacare, but the incident with Joe Wurzelbacher, a plumber in Holland, Ohio, kept echoing in reports and analyses of the bill. Barack Obama, the candidate, said, I think when you spread the wealth around, it's good for everybody. That off-the-cuff remark stayed in critics' minds, even when the president and the Democrat-controlled Congress suppressed open debate and the media focused on other aspects of the bill. Now that the bill has been rammed through and the president has signed it, Democratic politicians, from Sen. Max Baucus to Vice President Joseph R. Biden, are remarkably open about the real purpose of the bill - to spread the wealth around.

The trouble is, women and families are the ones who bear the brunt of Obamanomics' income redistribution. With the specifics of the legislation a closely-guarded secret known only to the liberal elite in Congress while it was under deliberation, it was not immediately clear that women and families were the ones bearing the brunt of the new taxation hidden in Obamacare. Supporters didn't talk about the bill's marriage penalty - the fact that it will redistribute wealth from married couples to cohabiting couples. They also didn't mention the fact that people on Medicare and Medicaid, disproportionately women, would receive less care and possibly worse care. Plus, nobody talked about the fact that the bill penalizes those employers that hire low-income workers, primarily single mothers and housewives needing a second income. So, instead of encouraging single mothers to marry the father of their children and to become financially independent by facilitating job growth, Obamacare creates another avenue of dependency through health insurance subsidies. …

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Obamanomics Fails Women and Families; Health Care Reform Costs Are Just the Tip of the Iceberg
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