Alternative Energy Spotlight; Debate Heats Up on Climate Change and Future Power Generation

The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia), May 13, 2010 | Go to article overview

Alternative Energy Spotlight; Debate Heats Up on Climate Change and Future Power Generation


ROCKHAMPTON climate change sceptic Terry Cardwell received hundreds of supportive emails from all over the world after The Morning Bulletin published his thoughts on coal-fired power generation before Christmas.

Here is the second instalment of his thoughts on the future of Australia's electricity generation.

One wonders if Kevin Rudd has an ulterior motive for doing his best to destroy the power industry.

It is not about what political persuasion or beliefs you have. It is about facts and the truth.

Certainly anything cleaner or cheaper is welcomed but only if it is cheaper, not because the greenies or wind generator and solar array manufacturers say so.

The cost to install, operate and maintain them is very high. Wind generators have killed hundreds of thousands of birds with bird strikes throughout the world.

Here are some of those screaming facts.

In the early 1980s California was seduced by renewable energy and proceeded to offer subsidies to anyone wanting to erect a wind generator. This subsidy ceased in the late 1990s as they ran out of money due to bankruptcy.

By 2008 they had over 18,000 wind generators scattered across California; 14,000 of them no longer operate, and some were cannibalised to keep the others running.

California's power cost has now doubled. Their thermal power generation has increased continually to compensate for this disaster and the input from the wind generators, after 30 years of development, producesA only 2.3%A of California's electricity.

There is also over 15,000 birds killed per year by bird strikes from wind generators.

Spain also embraced renewable energy with wind generators and solar array farms. A recent detailed analysis found that for every job created by state-funded support of renewables, particularly wind energy, 2.2 jobs were lost.

Each wind industry job created cost almost $2million in subsidies.

They now have an unemployment rate of 19%. The cost of power has gone up 100% and they are forced to import power from other countries.

Germany has over 7000 wind generators with over 2500 wind generator failures last year alone. The German experience is no different. Der Spiegel reports that "Germany's CO2 emissions haven't been reduced by even a single gram," and additional coal- and gas-fired plants have been constructed to ensure reliable supply.

Sweden has 5000 wind generators and 2000 wind generator failures.

During the cold weather in Europe last December, a large number of wind generators froze up and did not work at all. When they finally did they only generated 4% of their capacity.

Denmark, the world's most wind-intensive nation, with more than 6000 turbines generating 19% of its electricity, has yet to close a single fossil-fuel plant. It requires 50% more coal-generated electricity to cover wind power's unpredictability, and pollution and carbon dioxide emissions have risen by 36% in 2006 alone and continues to rise. …

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