Embattled Doctors & Patients: The Ballyhooed Healthcare Reform Bill Is Advertised as the Vehicle That Will Improve Access to Medical Care, While Making It Better and More "Fair." but It Will Do the Opposite

By Orient, Jane M. | The New American, May 10, 2010 | Go to article overview

Embattled Doctors & Patients: The Ballyhooed Healthcare Reform Bill Is Advertised as the Vehicle That Will Improve Access to Medical Care, While Making It Better and More "Fair." but It Will Do the Opposite


Orient, Jane M., The New American


The Obama administration finally finagled reticent Democrats into passing "healthcare reform," despite the fact that a majority of Americans were against the Democrats' bill. And the Democratic Party, as a whole, will likely face retribution by the public during elections in November, but the retaliation will probably not be for the reasons you might think.

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Though many Americans are against the "reform" because it represents the fulfillment of the final steps of full-blown socialism in America, in truth, a large majority of people express support for some socialistic features of the plan, such as those that effectively abolish insurance--forbidding insurers from "discriminating" against people with "pre-existing conditions" or setting a maximum lifetime insurance payout.

Some even argue that "healthcare reform" as recently enacted in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is not really socialized medicine. Indeed, it does not seize ownership of the healthcare sector.

However, it does violate the principles of insurance. Insurance defined is a voluntary sharing of catastrophic risks, with premiums based on risk and level of potential benefit. (See sidebar, page 18.) Healthcare reform is based on the fundamental axiom of socialism: "From each according to his abilities, to each according to his needs."

Socialism has been called "the war of all against all." It is exactly that in medicine, where the carnage, waste, and enmity of war is most appalling.

This should be abundantly evident to everyone. A number of states have already experimented with requiring guaranteed issue of insurance and community rating of insureds' risk, rather than individual assessments of risk, with consistent results: huge premium increases, pricing almost everyone out of the market, as in New York and New Jersey. Low-risk people see the new, high insurance premiums as a rip-off and refuse to buy. After all, with guaranteed issue of insurance, they can always buy in without penalty when they get sick. So premiums rise even more. Enter the Democrats' individual mandate, requiring everyone to buy insurance.

Under the mandate, we are promised that our insurance will be "affordable," but it is the government that will define the term and there is nothing in the healthcare bill that will reduce the cost of care--except perhaps by denying some people care. And your "fair share" of the "affordable" premiums will be collected by the government. Based on reports you will constantly have to file, the IRS will determine how much tax credit or subsidy you are entitled to. This will go directly to the insurer. If your income increases, your subsidy will decrease stepwise, which for some people could mean the equivalent of a marginal tax of 100 percent or more. Many may find that if they work harder, they will just be lining the pockets of insurance executives, not bringing home more money.

Now everyone gets punished by government for the improvidence of some--and the penalties the citizens will pay will extend beyond the monetary realm into their physical well-being.

Day-to-day Effects on Patients

Supposedly, under PPACA, everyone will pay into a great collective insurance pool--which at least for now will be owned by a cartel of government-approved and-regulated private insurers--then every- one will get healthcare: the right care to the right patients at the right time in the right place from the right providers, as available.

We have heard that expression many times from the giant managed-care cartels, and. the results will not be any better with government-controlled care.

The battles that are already happening, thanks to our partly socialized system of Medicare and Medicaid, will be greatly intensified. Already approximately 28 percent of doctors no longer take new Medicare patients; 50 percent of doctors don't take new Medicaid patients.

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Embattled Doctors & Patients: The Ballyhooed Healthcare Reform Bill Is Advertised as the Vehicle That Will Improve Access to Medical Care, While Making It Better and More "Fair." but It Will Do the Opposite
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