Baird's 3D Vision; Revealed: How the 'Very Latest TV Breakthrough' Was Actually Developed by Scottish Inventor 70 Years Ago

Daily Mail (London), May 24, 2010 | Go to article overview

Baird's 3D Vision; Revealed: How the 'Very Latest TV Breakthrough' Was Actually Developed by Scottish Inventor 70 Years Ago


Byline: Julie-Anne Barnes

IT is the must-have accessory, designed to enhance every viewing experience with crystal clear images.

But 3D television, heralded as the latest technological breakthrough, was in fact developed by the Scots father of television John Logie Baird - more than seven decades ago.

The famed innovator from Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire, created the first 3D pictures - complete with special glasses - in 1928, only one year after his historic broadcast from London to Glasgow.

But despite his early invention it has taken an additional 70 years for manufacturers to perfect his revolutionary concept.

News of the discovery comes as Scotland celebrates Logie Baird's landmark London to Glasgow broadcast, which took place 83 years ago today.

His son Malcolm, a retired chemical engineer, said: 'The image was lowdefinition, much the same as what was transmitted to Glasgow.

'This time there were two pictures that were alternating.

'One picture was one side of stereo for one eye and the other picture was for the other side. You wore special glasses and saw a three-dimensional picture.' World Cup organisers have confirmed they will be showing half of their matches in 3D for the first time in a deal secured between international footballing body FIFA and Sony.

Selected games will be broadcast from a number of stadia to pubs and cinemas worldwide.

The entertainment industry has been working hard to develop a common standard for 3D televisions.

But so far, only one Chinese manufacturer has produced a [pounds sterling]20,000 42-inch LCD 3D television which does not require special glasses.

Speaking from his home in Canada, 75-year-old Mr Baird said: 'Here we are in the present day and there is a great fashion for rubbishing what my father was doing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Baird's 3D Vision; Revealed: How the 'Very Latest TV Breakthrough' Was Actually Developed by Scottish Inventor 70 Years Ago
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.