Uniform Appeal

By Barrett, Wayne M. | USA TODAY, May 2010 | Go to article overview

Uniform Appeal


Barrett, Wayne M., USA TODAY


"WHERE THE DEVIL is the cup-underwear?" I demand ed. Came my wife's reply, "You know very well that I cannot get involved in that," No, indeed, for she is the family traveling secretary and I am the equipment manager. She arranges who is driven to what sporting event and I see to it that they are well-equipped to face whatever athletic challenges the day has to bring. True, she is able to pick which of our kids to watch play baseball, soccer, or hockey, but I still have the better job. Not only do I get to buy lots of cool stuff--like the wooden fungo bat I purchased online so I could hit fly balls to our boys at the park, or the big bucket of baseballs I use to throw BP to our sluggers, or the roller blades needed for the spring hockey season--I experience the extreme pleasure of watching them play with some of the very same equipment that I used during my yesteryears.

For example, Trevor, 10, is a fielding whiz in Little League this season with my mitt from college. Alex, 12, who just learned to skate earlier this spring, has blossomed into a key contributor on his roller hockey team using the "Soviet" sticks I secured when the Berlin Wall came down, and while I've never played soccer like Julie, she, too, has been able to showcase a piece of my youth by employing some of my old oversized jerseys as nightshirts.

If there is a fault in my job performance, it's that I like to bend the dress code. For instance, since I favor the Eastern European style of hockey--which was okay in high school when I rooted for the Russians in the Summit Series against Canada, but it sure caused problems when I found myself in Middle America at the University of Missouri cheering for the Soviet Union against Team USA in the 1980 Winter Olympics (the real Miracle on Ice was that I was able to get out of the Heartland with my diploma, and life, still intact)--I'm always looking to add a USSR flourish to my uniforms.

For instance, when I joined a beginner's hockey league, I fabricated a tale about my grandfather defecting from the Soviet Union and Americanizing his name when he came to the U.S. So, I had BARETZNKOV printed on the jersey. I even had them run the "K" backwards. Another time, when playing in a local Long Island house league, I covered the rink's logo on my jersey with a CCCP patch. On my dek hockey team, our uniforms were yellow and read Golden Blades. Not mine, which had an embroidered hammer and sickle across the front. Of course, I never doctor our kids' uniforms. Still, I can't help but wonder what Alex's roller hockey jersey would look like it sported a Team Slovakia Olympic patch, or if it really would be such a bad thing if his Little League Indians shirt showcased a retro patch of Chief Wahoo.

As for current projects, Trevor and I--he's the sole offspring who seems to share this passion with his dad--are working on a Washington Nationals jersey, since his little brother, Jesse Nathaniel, is named after that team; a Mudville Nine shirt, inspired as much by a sports-themed cafe we visited in Disney World as the famous poem; and a Kansas City hockey jersey (K. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Uniform Appeal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.