Europe's Other Great Sea; ADVERTISEMENT SPECIAL; More and More People Are Putting the Baltic Sea at the Top of Their Cruise Wish Lists. It Is a Region of High Culture, Architecture, History and Astonishing Natural Beauty. A Cruise Ship Lets You See It Best

Daily Mail (London), June 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Europe's Other Great Sea; ADVERTISEMENT SPECIAL; More and More People Are Putting the Baltic Sea at the Top of Their Cruise Wish Lists. It Is a Region of High Culture, Architecture, History and Astonishing Natural Beauty. A Cruise Ship Lets You See It Best


THERE was a time when people planning on taking a cruise dreamed of sailing south towards the sun. These days, the Baltic coast and Norway's fjords have come into their own as must-see areas. And don't assume that a Baltic or Norway cruise means cold weather. These itineraries are only offered in the summer, when it can be even hotter there than around the Mediterranean.

Warmed by Gulf Stream air, there are few better places to be in the world than sailing through the 24,000-island archipelago outside Stockholm en route to Helsinki during one of the long, hot, summer nights that extend daylight hours between June and September. Your cruise ship towers over tiny wooden houses used as summer escapes by Swedes and Finns as it squeezes through seemingly impossibly narrow channels which divide the multitude of islands.

This is just one of many highlights of what the cruise lines call a 'Northern Capitals' itinerary. But while Stockholm, Oslo, Helsinki and Copenhagen are all excellent destinations,the non-capital cities also make an impact. There are at least 19 ports of call across the region's 10 countries - Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Russia and Sweden.

For a typical seven-night Northern Capitals cruise, you will fly to Amsterdam or Copenhagen to board your ship. On a 14-night cruise, you can board at UK ports like Dover, Harwich or Southampton.

Stockholm, Copenhagen, Oslo and Helsinki are all easy to explore on foot, each demonstrating Scandinavian style through modern shops and classic architecture. From the narrow cobbled streets of Stockholm's Gamla Stan medieval quarter to the wonderful Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen, Oslo's Viking House Museum and the elegant Lutheran Cathedral of Helsinki,all display a sense of history while exuding a feeling of calm that contrasts with the Mediterranean's often chaotic capitals.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Europe's Other Great Sea; ADVERTISEMENT SPECIAL; More and More People Are Putting the Baltic Sea at the Top of Their Cruise Wish Lists. It Is a Region of High Culture, Architecture, History and Astonishing Natural Beauty. A Cruise Ship Lets You See It Best
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.