13 FRIDAY THERE GOES THE FEAR; Enter the Strange World of Phobias

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), June 12, 2010 | Go to article overview

13 FRIDAY THERE GOES THE FEAR; Enter the Strange World of Phobias


Byline: Craig McQueen

MOST of us are scared of something, whether it's snakes, spiders, or English commentators during the World Cup.

But every now and then, you hear of a di erent phobia which doesn't seem to make sense.

Take school bosses in Su olk, who had their knuckles rapped in court over the case of a boy who was diagnosed by a psychologist as having a "school phobia".

Education chiefs were accused of discriminating against the boy, now aged 16, who was allowed to skip lessons by his parents.

But if that phobia sounds strange, check these out: EPHEBIPHOBIA e abnormal or irrational and persistent fear and/or loathing of teenagers or adolescence.

COULROPHOBIA e fear of clowns doesn't just refer to sinister ones in horror lms. Circus clowns with red noses, giant feet and green hair are just as scary.

ERGASIOPHOBIA Fear of work is a real condition, with psychologists believing that it could point to an underlying mental health problem. PARASKAVEDEKATRIAPHOBIA e fear of Friday the 13th has only been around since the mid-19th century but, when the date comes around, economies lose millions in lost business thanks to people who won't get on a plane, sign up to something, or even leave the house.

CALIGYNEPHOBIA e fear of beautiful women a ects a surprising number of men, leaving them feeling anxious and fearful when an attractive lady is nearby.

NEOPHOBIA e persistent and abnormal fear of anything new, this condition leaves su erers feeling angry, frustrated or scared.

GYMNOPHOBIA i s can leave people unable to form relationships through anxiety and feelings of inadequacy about their body.

TAPHOPHOBIA anks to the many horror stories of people being pronounced dead only to wake up, it's no surprise that some people have a phobia of being buried alive.

PTERONOPHOBIA e fear of being tickled by feathers is a phobia picked up in childhood, especially if someone is tickled against their will. …

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