Handwriting Analysis Set to Reveal More on Job Seekers

Cape Times (South Africa), June 21, 2010 | Go to article overview

Handwriting Analysis Set to Reveal More on Job Seekers


BYLINE: STAFF WRITER

A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it would seem that a handwritten paragraph is worth even more.

Graphology, or handwriting analysis, is becoming a popular and accepted means of assessing an applicant's personality as part of the recruitment process, says Kirsten Halcrow, managing director of Employers' Mutual Protection Service.

"Like fingerprints, each person's handwriting is unique, and is considered a reliable indicator of personality and behaviour. Graphology is gaining the attention of academics the world over as this science develops into a reliable and valid measuring instrument for a variety of applications, including personnel selection, career coaching and team building," she says.

"As the business world begins to realise that human capital is its most valuable asset, human resources professionals are searching for new and improved ways of identifying the most competent and suitable applicants for various positions, people who will adjust to the culture of the company.

"Recognising the integral role personality should play in the selection process and employee relationship management, human resource managers are turning increasingly to analysing the more subtle traits of prospective employees."

Handwriting analysis is a complex exercise which measures the involuntary impulses between the brain and the hand, foot or mouth, whichever is used to write.

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Handwriting Analysis Set to Reveal More on Job Seekers
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