Listing the Top 10 Lists in the Librarian's Book of Lists

American Libraries, June-July 2010 | Go to article overview

Listing the Top 10 Lists in the Librarian's Book of Lists


At some point in my life, I realized that making lists belongs on my list of top 10 favorite things to do," says American Libraries Senior Editor George M. Eberhart, "and that's how I came up with the idea for The Librarian's Book of Lists." To be released this summer by ALA Editions, the book is a collection of humorous, serious, and sometimes bizarre lists that Eberhart hopes will be "at least tangentially useful and informative, especially for librarians and book-lovers."

Best known to readers as the editor of ALA's weekly e-newsletter, American Libraries Direct and four editions of The Whole Library Handbook, Eberhart says many of the lists featured in his new work were created especially for the book. Here are some of the choicest items to whet your appetite for more:

1 10 Suggestions for a Library-Related Ben and Jerry's Flavor.

Book By Its Cover. It looks like plain vanilla, but it's actually vanilla with white chocolate swirls mixed in.

2 10 Book Curses.

"May the sword of anathema slay / If anyone steals this book away."--Found on the first folio of a fourteenth-century fragment of Die vier Bucher der Konige.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

3 6 Birds that make Library-Related Sounds.

The Yellow Headed Warbler (Teetistris fernandinae), found only in Cuba, makes a noisy, rasping shhh-shhh-shhh-shhh-shhh. You knew there would be one somewhere.

4 Top 12 Silly reasons to Ban a Book.

It accurately describes the history of life on earth. Juliet Clutton-Brock's Horse was challenged at the Smith Elementary School in Helena, Montana, in 2004 because a concerned parent said there were "too many questions with evolutionary theory to present it as fact." She specifically objected to this passage: "It took about 55 million years for the present family of horses, asses, and zebras to evolve from their earliest horselike ancestor."

5 5 Things to Remember When When the Media Calls.

Ask questions. Determine the name of the publication or media outlet. Find out the story's theme, the reporter's angle, and the deadline. …

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Listing the Top 10 Lists in the Librarian's Book of Lists
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