Components- Based Access Control Architecture

By Sodiya, Adesina S.; Onashoga, Adebukola S. | Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology, Annual 2009 | Go to article overview

Components- Based Access Control Architecture


Sodiya, Adesina S., Onashoga, Adebukola S., Issues in Informing Science & Information Technology


Introduction

The most widely used mechanism for preventing unauthorized access to systems is Identification and Authentication. Identification is the process where a user gives a valid and recognized identity to the system and authentication is the process whereby the system verifies the supplied identity. Access control, which is the concept of authorization, is concerned with determining the allowed activities of legitimate users (Scott-Chapman, 2006). The major aim of access control systems is to protect system resources against inappropriate and undesired user access. To reduce the security risks on computer systems as much as possible, there is a need to define who is allowed to access the stored information, which system resources the user is allowed to access, and what type of actions he/she is allowed to perform on those resources. Access control is one of the most important security mechanisms in the network environment and web services. Access control consists of policy, model and mechanism. The policy is the statement of what is, and what is not allowed, while the model is the formal representation of the security policies enforced by the system and is useful for proving the theoretical limitations of a system. The mechanism is a method, tool, or procedure for enforcing the Access Control Policy (NISTIR, 2006).

Access control systems are generally classified as Discretionary Access Control (DAC) and Non-Discretionary Access Control (NDAC). In DAC, the object owner or anyone else who is authorized to control the object's access specifies who have access to the object or specifies the policies.

All access control policies other than DAC are categorized as NDAC. In NDAC, policies are rules that are not specified at the discretion of the user. Some examples of NDAC are:

i. Mandatory Access Control (MAC):- This technique specifies that access control policy decisions are made by a central authority and not by the individual owner of the object. For example, the individual owner of an object can not specify whether an object is Top Secret and so on.

ii. Role-based Access Control (RBAC):- This describes the technique in which categories and duties of users are considered before permissions are granted to invoke an operation. The different categories are predefined, and have varying amount of privileges. The users will be placed in these categories. A user may be assigned many roles, but may not execute all his roles at the same time.

iii. Purpose-based Access Control (PBAC):- In this case, access is granted based on the intentions of the subjects. Each user is required to state his or her access purpose when trying to access an object. For example, in a school environment, data is collected for registration, checking of results, and so on. The system validates the stated access purpose by the user to make sure that the user is indeed allowed for the access purpose.

iv. History-based Access Control (HBAC):- This describes an access control technique in which access is granted based on the previous records. A subject is granted access to an object if logical the subject have previous access to the object to some reasonable threshold.

v. Temporal Constraints Access Control (TCAC):- This involves access control policies in which time restrictions are attached resource access. For example, some activities must be performed within a reasonable period.

vi. Rule-based Access Control (RuBAC):- This describes the technique that allows subjects or users to access objects based on pre-determined and configured rules. RuBAC is a general term for access control system that allows some form of organization-defined rules.

However, most of the current access control techniques are not completely adequate to ensure effective access control to computer resources because they are still faced with some problems. Some of the problems are:-

* the difficult to tailor access based on various attributes or constraints

* the difficulty in encapsulating all possible job functions and requirements to access objects

* inadequate capability of the administrator to compose all rules that covers the necessary access constraints and permission between subjects, operations and objects because of dynamic nature of operation

* non-prevention unauthorized access

* denial of authorized access because of complicated rules, etc. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Components- Based Access Control Architecture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.