How Sweet of Tom Parlon to Fret over the Fate of Frail Women Driven out of [Euro]10m Homes by That Nasty Nama

Daily Mail (London), June 29, 2010 | Go to article overview

How Sweet of Tom Parlon to Fret over the Fate of Frail Women Driven out of [Euro]10m Homes by That Nasty Nama


Byline: Brenda Power

WERE you to pick a single figure to exemplify what was venal and self-serving about the relationship between politicians and developers in the boom times, you'd have a hard job to do better than Tom Parlon.

And if you were looking for proof that the bubble of deluded entitlement, in which this relationship flourished, has yet to burst; Parlon is your only man.

A former farmers' leader, Parlon was a big catch for the PDs in 2002 and, on his first day in the Dail, was parachuted straight into the Department of Finance. He remained there as a Junior Minister right up to 2007 or, in other words, throughout the period when that department, and indeed that entire Government, were run to serve the best interests of the voracious construction industry.

He threw huge money at his re-election campaign but, when he was dumped by the voters, far-sighted Tom had a reserve parachute to hand.

He was promptly rescued from the ignominy of a mere Seanad seat by the Construction Industry Federation, of all people, and installed as its director general on a salary of [euro]250,000. And his contacts in Finance, where he played second fiddle to Brian Cowen as they laid the groundwork for the near-bankruptcy of the public purse, was hardly a hindrance to his elevation.

It is, of course, his well-paid job to lobby on behalf of the construction industry and to steamroll their priorities to the top of the political agenda.

But even so, Tom's latest pitch for his paymasters is so brazen and utterly disconnected from reality as to make Ivor Callely's defence of his expense claims look perfectly reasonable. Tom, you see, has just discovered a passionate concern for the lot of the stay-at-home mammy.

SPECIFICAlly, he's worried sick about the stay-at-home mammy who may be in danger of losing the roof over her head. Sadly, though, Tom's heart seemingly bleeds only for the stay-at-home mammy whose said home is valued at [euro]10million or more, and only where she happens to be married to one of his big property developer buddies.

Ordinary riff-raff, the sort of losers whose homes are at risk because they bought them at inflated prices from Tom's wealthy pals, don't appear to concern him in the least.

He is horrified at the idea that his mates and their WAGS might face eviction from their lavish homes. That's homes, plural. Imagine, just because these heroes owe hundreds of millions to Nama, the hideous prospect of the taxpayers getting their grubby paws on their Marbella villas and Vermont ski lodges and Manhattan townhouses, much less their Ballsbridge mansions with swimming pools, home cinemas and rooftop Jacuzzis.

Imagine the shame for all those trophy wives if they've got to pack their louis Vuitton trunks, wave goodbye to the wine-cellar and the spa and the helipad, and haul ass to some cramped six-bedroom red-brick in Ranelagh, just like famine-era cottagers except with American fridge-freezers and Aga ranges.

No wonder Tom is lying awake at night. And no wonder that, in some of those sleepless small hours, he found himself turning to the Constitution for solace.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Sweet of Tom Parlon to Fret over the Fate of Frail Women Driven out of [Euro]10m Homes by That Nasty Nama
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.