Learning Styles Reflections on Your Child's Giftedness

Manila Bulletin, June 30, 2010 | Go to article overview

Learning Styles Reflections on Your Child's Giftedness


Every child has genius potential in more ways than one.A child is not necessarily Learning Disabled (LD), but simply Teaching Disabled (TD).Giftedness should not be confined to a score or an IQ achievement test.Our idea for creative accomplishment potential resides in all children. The challenge is to help parents transform that potential into reality.We should be cautious about predicting a limiting future for any child. Instead, we should always leave room for children to work for challenges that are beyond just getting along.We should not ask "Is my child gifted or talented?" or "How gifted is my child?" Ask "How is my child gifted?"Creativity is the ability to come up with new ideas, to create or imagine new possibilities, to look at problems from a different point of view, and to take the risk of trying something that has never been done before.Creativity is the foundation of all problem-solving or decision-making skills.Everybody has a learning style and every style offers particular strengths, but each person's strengths are unique. Environmental, emotional, sociological, physiological and psychological characteristics - everything that manage how we concentrate on process, and remember new and difficult information - contribute to learning style.Most children learn in one or two different processing styles - analytic or global. Analytic learners learn more easily when information is introduced ii a step-by-step or fact-by-fact. They prefer to learn in a logical, sequential way. They see first the trees before the forest. Global learners learn best through short stories. They prefer to learn through humor, illustrations, or graphics. They prefer to see first the forest before the trees.How well your child learns depends on how well the teaching styles match his or her processing style.Don't insist that your child study in an environment with which you feel comfortable. Instead, either let them work as they wish, or alternate their environments and observe the results of both conditions - their way and yours.Nurturing giftedness requires an atmosphere that allows creativity and talent to flow.Children become more and more motivated to learn when they enjoy what they are doing.Some children feel most comfortable with patterns and routines; others prefer variety and tend to be adventuresome.Most "hyperactive" children are not clinically hyperactive; they are normal kids in need of more mobility. …

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Learning Styles Reflections on Your Child's Giftedness
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