The Job Search: Where Marketing Skills Pay Off: When He Recently Found Himself out of Work, Veteran Bank Marketer Scott V. Williams Used His Promotional Savvy to Land Another Position at a Time When Few Financial Institutions Were Hiring

By Williams, Scott V. | ABA Bank Marketing, June 2010 | Go to article overview

The Job Search: Where Marketing Skills Pay Off: When He Recently Found Himself out of Work, Veteran Bank Marketer Scott V. Williams Used His Promotional Savvy to Land Another Position at a Time When Few Financial Institutions Were Hiring


Williams, Scott V., ABA Bank Marketing


Before starting your current job several months ago, you went through a period where you were out of work. Can you explain that situation?

I was working for a bank in Florida. The bank was negatively affected by the downturn in the economy and the real estate market, and went through several rounds of layoffs that eventually affected my job.

How easy was it to find another bank marketing job in the current economy?

The job market today for bank marketers is very competitive. A lot of banks around the country have downsized, and there is an excess of experienced personnel looking for work.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

If you have an area of marketing specialization--such as with an MCIF, online banking or social media--there seem to be more advertised positions. Jobs for bank marketing managers are less common, although they definitely exist. What I have seen is that banks are more likely to fill a position with a local candidate because there are so many qualified people close to home. There is less of a need for candidates who will require relocation expense.

Based upon your experience, what advice would you give to other bank marketers looking for a job?

The first thing you need to do is to decide whether you are going to look for bank marketing job or whether you are going to consider a marketing job in another industry. Next, you have to decide where you are going to look--what geographic area.

What decision did you make with respect to these issues?

I decided that I would search for a bank marketing job, but, if that didn't pan out, I was open to a marketing job in another industry. Geographically, I was willing to relocate anywhere in the country, but my preference was for North Carolina, upstate South Carolina or Texas. I targeted these states because these are areas that I had worked in previously and thus I had personal contacts that I could use to help me uncover job possibilities and make connections at companies that I was interested in working for.

Any other suggestions for job hunters?

First off, don't give up! It took me a year--almost to the day--from the time I left my previous bank and started with First Bank.

Second, don't limit yourself. Marketing skills can translate to other industries, so you may need to look in other related industries in addition to banking.

Third, get connected. If you lose your job, don't be embarrassed to reach out to your network of friends and industry contacts. Most of them are glad to help but may not know exactly how. Let them know the type of job you are looking for or which companies you are targeting so they can help improve your search success.

Fourth, stay connected. Make a point to check in with your key contacts to update them on your search progress or changes in your focus. You never know what may have crossed their path since the last conversation. Reaching out to them also serves as a reminder that you are still searching.

Did you have to stay in touch with people in person?

It didn't seem to matter how I stayed in touch--in person or by telephone or by e-mail or social media channels like LinkedIn and Facebook--as long as I stayed in touch.

I understand that you spent a great deal of time trying to get acquainted with prospective companies by talking to people who worked for the organizations--even if they weren't hiring.

Yes, you learn a lot by doing that. I talked to people in other banks, but I also stayed in touch with service providers--software providers, ad agencies, public relations firms and industry consultants.

I found out about job opportunities that weren't being advertised. I never would have heard about them if it hadn't been for my connections.

And eventually your contacts led you to a job?

Yes. Karen Slover, my contact at Harland Financial Solutions, had a client who was trying to fill a marketing leadership position. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Job Search: Where Marketing Skills Pay Off: When He Recently Found Himself out of Work, Veteran Bank Marketer Scott V. Williams Used His Promotional Savvy to Land Another Position at a Time When Few Financial Institutions Were Hiring
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.