Gender, Abuse Influence Teen Suicidal Behavior

By McNamara, Damian | Clinical Psychiatry News, June 2010 | Go to article overview

Gender, Abuse Influence Teen Suicidal Behavior


McNamara, Damian, Clinical Psychiatry News


ORLANDO -- Girls in high school are more likely than are boys, regardless of age or race/ethnicity, to report being depressed, having seriously considered suicide, making a suicide plan, or attempting suicide in the past 12 months.

However, "when there is a suicide attempt, males are more likely to be injured than are females," according to Robert M. Fernquist, Ph.D. "Males, when they do it, tend to do it more severely."

In addition, a history of abuse emerged as the greatest predictor of suicidal behavior in these children.

"Rarely is suicide spontaneous--often there is a plan," said Dr. Fernquist, professor of sociology at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg. "If there is a trajectory, there is probably depression first, then considering it, then making a plan."

For that reason, Dr. Fernquist focused on specific questions asked in five Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) surveys conducted between 1999 and 2007. He assessed answers to five questions that asked whether, during the last 12 months, the responder had been depressed, considered suicide, made a suicide plan, and/or attempted suicide; and of those who had attempted suicide, if they had been injured as a result (defined as requiring medical attention).

An average of 154 high schools and 14,424 students in grades 9-12 participated in the survey, for a total of approximately 70,000 responses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention established the YRBSS to assess health-related behaviors in youth. Every other year, YRBSS researchers survey a nationally representative sample of public and private high school students.

Dr. Fernquist classified the students by gender as well as by age and race or ethnicity. For example, he compared responses from students aged 13-15 years with those aged 16-18 years because "younger teens ... are mentally different than older, more mature teens."

The percentage of high school students who had felt depressed in the previous 12 months was higher among girls across all groupings. "In every case, females were significantly more depressed than males," Dr. Fernquist said. For example, among students aged 13-15 years, 33% of black girls and 20% of black boys reported depression, as did 30% of Asian girls and 18% of Asian boys.

"Certainly not everyone who is depressed attempts suicide," Dr. Fernquist said. Overall, a weighted average of 14.5% of high school students said they had seriously considered attempting suicide during the previous 12 months.

Again, there was a female predominance for consideration of suicide across all age and racial or ethnic comparisons. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gender, Abuse Influence Teen Suicidal Behavior
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.