E Is for Explosion: E-Readers, Etextbooks, Econtent, Elearning, E-Everything

By Rivera, Victor | Multimedia & Internet@Schools, July-August 2010 | Go to article overview

E Is for Explosion: E-Readers, Etextbooks, Econtent, Elearning, E-Everything


Rivera, Victor, Multimedia & Internet@Schools


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Social media and learning technology have been hot for some time now, but with the sudden proliferation of ebooks, e-readers, etextbooks, and interactive digital content, technology in education is approaching its flash point.

In case you weren't feeling it, welcome to the revolution! By the end of 2010, Gen Y members will outnumber Baby Boomers, and 96% of this new generation has already joined a social network, according to author and social media pundit Erik Qualman. Radio took 38 years to reach 50 million users, television took 13 years, the internet just 4 years, the iPod only 3--and what about Facebook? The king of social media added 100 million users in less than 9 months.

At the same time, a 2009 U.S. Department of Education study showed online students outperforming their face-to-face counterparts, while 1 in 6 higher education students enrolled in online courses. Also, according to the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, 57% of experts agree with the prediction that, enabled by information technologies, the pace of learning in the next decade will increasingly be set by student choices. In 10 years, most students will spend at least part of their "school days" in virtual classes, grouped online with others who share their interests, mastery, and skills.

There's an explosion happening, but it's just now starting to spread. Scottsdale, Ariz.-based market research firm Compass Intelligence estimates that technology spending in the U.S. educational market may grow to $61.9 billion by 2013, from $47.6 billion in 2008.

Meanwhile, the publishing world continues to be complemented (or usurped) by new e-reading devices daily. It's not just Kindle; now there's Kindle DX, nook, Alex, Kobo, Sony Reader Daily Edition, QUE proReader, iLiad, eDGe, FLEPia, COOL-ER, Story, HP Slate, Copia, and Skiff, among many others--all arriving on the scene within the last few months.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

But they're empty without content, brought to you in part by educational publishers (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt K--12, Pearson Education, Kaplan, Prentice Hall, McGraw-Hill, Follett) trying to keep up with the demand of cash-strapped schools looking for cost-reduced textbooks as but one way of grappling with ever-shrinking budgets.

According to a cursory review of Amazon, an average etextbook costs anywhere between 10% and 40% less than a print textbook. Traditional publishers are on it, working with smaller specialty houses (namely ScrollMotion) to ensure their content becomes econtent, knowing that a simple PDF version won't cut it (read: There's a big difference between the presentation of A Tale of Two Cities and a biology textbook, for example).

And how does the rock star of gadgets, the iPad, change things? The iPad fallout is just now arriving in classrooms near you. For starters, there's an app that makes chemistry more student-accessible in 2 minutes than a century of instruction has ever done (see The Elements). And all those publishers aforementioned? They have big plans for the iPad. More on that soon.

Quoted in a recent Wall Street Journal article, Rik Kranenburg, group president of higher education for McGraw-Hill, nailed it--and this goes for K--12 as well: "People have been talking about the impact of technology on education for 25 years. It feels like it's really going to happen in 2010."

In fact, it's already underway. Suddenly, what began decades back as a dream and a vision is now a solid reality. Technological (bandwidth, devices), cultural (tech-native students), and economic factors (desperate schools and desperately innovative com panies) have converged to yield the current scene. Not since the advent of Gutenburg's printing press has there been such radical change to the very core of education--the written word.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

E Is for Explosion: E-Readers, Etextbooks, Econtent, Elearning, E-Everything
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.